Fun

Atlas Insider: Lights, Camera, Brioche!

By Kay Gardiner
June 26, 2022
Let's brioche! Nancy Marchant's stunning patterns are your entry into a beautiful way of knitting.

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526 Comments
  • Experimentation!

  • Practice makes perfect. Almost.

    • Hands on. Video is great and I like written instructions, but I have to do to learn.

      • Definitely lots of videos and multiple approaches, along with patience and lifelines.

      • Video tutorials are great! Thanks

      • Tasting as food is my biggest craft. I always have alot of volunteers to test and critique the outcomes.

  • My husband – he knows nothing about knitting but show him a video and he can talk me through how to do it! Just recently I was upset with my sewing up of a baby cardigan. He watched a couple of videos and talked me through using matress stitch for seaming. Suddenly i could do it.
    Thank you darling

    • He’s a keeper!

      • I’m big on collecting paper — photocopies from books I own and from online sources (retired librarian). But watching YouTube videos is how I learn the best these days

      • I love having videos to watch pause and watc h again!

    • You are very fortunate ‼️

    • Aww! That’s amazing!

  • YouTube is my biggest support these days

    • I find YouTube or any other video source the best tool for me. Clear written instructions that I can read over a few times help as well.

  • Clearly labeled and numbed steps!

    • Funny autocorrect!

  • written instructions, perfect practice makes perfect and a great video doesn’t hurt.

  • YouTube of course and thirst for knowledge. I love learning something new.

    • You Tube and MDK!

      • My knitting teacher, Heather, who has the patience of a saint to demo multiple times til I get it. My little group has been together 10 yrs and we learn a lot from each other

        • Watching a video and then following along doing the actual knitting steps as I watch the video… cements the new skill in! So much nicer than having to read the steps and hope you understood!

    • Video plus written instructions.

  • I am a very visual leaner. So watching a video is much better than pages of instructions! Thanks for all you do.

  • I find it super helpful to watch a video to make sure I’m interpreting any written stitch guidance correctly.

  • Great job on the video! Videos help me. Seeing it done is the first step. And when I try, having the video there to rewind and guide me is really nice.

    • I am a visual learner, so videos/YouTubes I can replay again and again have helped me through turning a sock heel, stranded color work and even warping a floor loom.

      • Pictures and words, as always.

    • I have to agree with everyone else here. YouTube videos have taught me so much from knitting to machine sewing to cooking, mosaics and gardening techniques.

    • I learned brioche from the words and pictures in the guide. But the video was a good reassurance I was doing ok.

      • Video is super helpful for certain techniques but generally I’m partial to written instructions and diagrams. I love some good step by step diagrams!

  • Google and Youtube! Growing up it would mean a trip to the library to check out whatever books I could find.

  • I find a video and clear instructions to go along with it very helpful.

  • Definitely videos, especially those that are just a few minutes long. I want to see the technique in action (I’m a ‘get to the point’ person) and also LOVE to see the way others knit/hold their yarn.

  • Combination of book info and google

  • Youtube, because the presenters NEVER get irritated with you no matter how many time times you ask them to repeat the continental purl technique

  • Best support for me? Over the shoulder views, screenshots at each step, verbage, video, some well done artistic drawings in closeup detail- NOT video looking AT the person presenting the video.

  • I like to read through the instructions AND watch/hear a video. The more senses involved the better. Holding the needles at the same time gets another sense tied in. I wonder if there’s a way to get the sense of smell involved too?

  • I am also a visual learner and I am a self taught knitter (pre YouTube). But the advent of that little app was a Game Changer for me as a knitter!!! I look for videos for learning anything knitting. And honestly I think it is better than taking a class simply because you get the correct visual with the hands in front of you personally. And not with everyone crowded over the same shoulders of one knitter teaching a class. All that plus stopping and reviewing as many times as you need: Win! Your brioche video was great! Thanks so much!

  • My dogs keep me rethinking what I’m doing by demanding to go outside or causing a ruckus somewhere in the house so that I periodically drop everything to tend to them.

  • Video plus written instructions w practice, practice, practice

  • Video without a doubt! Sometimes need an extra slow motion viewing to make sure I fully understand.

  • First, reading about the new technique, then seeing someone execute the technique, then trying the new technique myself. See one, do one, but it will be a while before I can teach brioche.

  • A well written and formatted pattern is what works best for me. If I still flounder, I’ll head to YouTube.

  • Most times clear, step-by-step, instructions are all I need but when I was learning to do the heel gusset for my first sock, a YouTube video got me over the hump.

  • YouTube

  • Absolutely Google and YouTube. Though I find many instructions are sooooooo wordy, so I watch with the sound off, especially to establish something I’m just brushing up on!
    The brioche video however was marvelous to follow, slow, steady, and very clear! Thank you!

  • A good video and then lots of practice until I achieve muscle memory!

  • Definitely YouTube! I am a visual learner, especially with knitting. I just need to see it.

  • Videos! Also, helpful tips from fellow knitters!

  • Youtube and Patty Lyons! I have to see it, I can read about a thing until the cows come home, but until I see it in action it ain’t happening, lol!

  • You tube for most things. I like being able to stop and repeat the tricky parts. Currently, I’m learning how to spin yarn on a wheel and find in person for feedback and questions is super helpful.

  • Videos for sure!

  • I used to prefer written instructions but as I age I find I’ve become more of a visual learner. Videos are the answer for me so thanks MDK team!

    • Both written instruction and video and then practice!

  • Video! This video was super helpful in my Learn Brioche Quest. I’ve basically learned to knit watching videos (over and over and over…..)

  • YouTube! Either a video made by the designer or one just out there in the wild. I love that you’ve made a video in your own super creative and quirky way!

  • I have some books that I refer to but most often, I now look to online videos to watch the processes that I need. There is so much out there, it’s amazing.

  • I truly appreciate detailed written directions with video tutorials showing the hands of your skilled knitter so I can work the stitches right along with the video. Having access to it all when it works for my schedule is a game changer❣
    I’m a nurse, so getting to a brick & mortar store for help during their store hours is nearly impossible…and knitting has helped to keep me sane through these past couple of years. I’ve been gifting most items I’ve made, which helps others to feel loved as well. So grateful for the knitting support…share the love❣

  • My favorite learning setting is a small class, with a real teacher and hands on. Seems those days are gone due to COVID, gas prices and times constraints in general. It’s nice though to see the creative ways folks are improvising, THANX!

  • If it is a new pattern- I just jump right in with the written instructions. Doesn’t help me to read the ahead of time – I need the needles in hand as you suggested. But a new technique- YouTube is the go to without a doubt. I can watch it over and over (and over!) again until I get it right.

  • Visual learner, here! I love the vids!

  • I need to just do it. I’m not worried about mistakes as they are all part of the learning process. I watched the zoom tutorial and discussion yesterday, as I was working during the live session, cast on the stitches and ready to go. I love the MDK challenges.

  • Definitely videos – usually with lots of pausing and rewatching.

  • Visual information. That used to be just a good written pattern with charts and sketches. Video significantly improved all of that. Live classes are great, but the ability to pause or replay an unlimited number of times is a bonus.

  • I need it all. Read the directions, work with someone in person and if that’s not available then watch a video (from the knitters view point). Stitch and repeat. I’ve been wanting to brave brioche for a while. I think it’s time

  • Short videos! Anything over a few minutes and my mind starts to wander.
    But really my favorite learning method is to do it with a group of friends, in person. Nothing beats having a real human being there explaining…

  • I will write out each step. If that isn’t enough I will have someone read each step aloud so I can perform the task without interruption.

  • Videos on youtube, my knitstars videos, my knitter’s companion book have all been helpful to me. I definitely appreciate it when designers take the time to create tutorials for specific techniques in their patterns.

  • A good reference book and a video.

  • Your brioche video is a great help in getting started!

    • I go to my last secretary, A.P. she always seems to know the answer. And we have such fun!

  • I like YouTube to get a general idea, but I love to follow written step by step directions with photos! I also like my husband or mom hanging around doe moral support ❤️

  • First reading the written instructions, then I look for a video demonstrating the new technique (thank you for your Brioche video!) and finally practice makes perfect!

  • I find it helpful to not be rushed–no deadline, no pressure. Take your time at the pace you need.

  • I live Instant Replay! On YouTube it is that 10 seconds back; on the original Crafsy platform you could slow down and go back 30 seconds. My hands must move so my brain can engage and then… Voila!

  • Well-written instructions to study initially and then a good video is wonderful to fully understand what I am doing. Hats off to your team. Your video was excellent! And speaking of that manicure, want to share the polish color??

  • If a picture is worth a thousand words, a video is worth zillions. I have commented before on what an amazing team MDK has brought together. Absolute stars! If there is an academy for great contributors to daily dazzle in the fiber arts, all, including their leaders, would have top awards….heavy golden trophies with needles held high. Thank you and love to you all.

    • PS so thrilled with the video, I forgot to answer your actual question. I prefer vids that aren’t overly wordy. And when I’m watching to learn a stitch, please don’t begin by telling me how yarn is spun or how to best raise sheep. Stick to the knitting as Tom Peters advised.

  • Video definitely helps me but the most important thing is other folks/friends to accompany me on the journey. I like to talk through what I am learning, what I am noticing about the process. I can do this seemingly endlessly. Few can tolerate this as well as someone else engaged in the same journey!

  • I like both written instructions with detailed pictures and videos because both give a different perspective for my brain. I also channel my dear mom telling me to “stand up straight, hold my head up, take a deep breath and tell myself that I can do anything” – love and miss you mom!

  • Mindful connection to the rewarding adventure of the process, allowing myself grace and space and patience to make mistakes, and well-edited(!) video tutorials.

  • I usually read the words first, look at diagrams and then the video but really love the feedback from an in person session. I prefer a short to the point video without a lot of chatter.

  • The ability to see it and do it in a repeatedly fashion like having someone standing over my shoulder with cautionary reminders or better still having a stop and start video. Thanks MDK

  • My biggest supports are the rewind and pause buttons!

  • Videos and matching the knitting language to the action so that I can then follow written patterns and charts’ abbreviations.

    I’ve learning better cooking knife skills from watching certain cooking shows that start with the whole produce instead of it alreading prepped in the little dishes.

  • Video really helps as I learn something new. I can stop and go back as many times as I want. I also like that it is always available.

  • I watch YouTube videos mostly, if I still have questions after reading the written instructions.

  • I work best with a video in tandem with written instructions… I have yet to master brioche so I’m giving your video a try.

  • I mainly use YouTube when I’m learning a new skill or technique.

    • For knitting, videos are extremely helpful. But they have to be well done – close up, some steps repeated, not a lot of chitter chatter. Suzanne Bryan does it really well.

  • For me, having someone next to me showing me how to actually do the stitch or cast on that I am attempting to learn and then doing it myself, with their watchful eye on my hands and needles.

  • I’ve recently discovered the joys of video use, over and over. Brioche may have played into that. The squish factor is outrageous!

  • I like to read through the instructions, then begin. A good video can be magiical when learning a new technique. Thank you MDK.

  • Videos help me, usually on YouTube.

  • I love reading instructions for a new thng, and then watching a video to make sure I understand all the steps. Best help I have seen lately is Patty Lyons and her Swatchzilla. Bigger is better! Also, high contrast between yarn and needle so you really see what’s happening! Loved the MDK zoom, I am working on my cowl a lot!

    • I was assuming that I would learn brioche technique from the video and was so pleased that MDK was going to provide it. But when I tried to set things up using the Field Guide the written instructions were so clear I just kept going. I’m halfway through the cowl already and have never gotten around to watching the video until this morning! Bless you MDK! I have learned so much from you!

  • Learning new knitting techniques through a combination of videos from expert knitters and then referencing those in written form on the pattern, or from my own notes. And sharing new ideas with my knitting friends.

  • I love the video I can’t wait to start my own brioche journey.

  • I am a visual learner. I go to youtube to see demonstrations on knitting stitches that I want to learn.

  • Absolutely watching a video nnover and over if necessary.

  • I am a visual learner…so it’s either in-person or YouTube!

  • Helpful videos with gentle narration.

  • Step by step video – slow motion options a plus!

  • I like instructions with step by step illustrations and written descriptions. My kids learn everything off YouTube but I seem to need a slower pace, although if I’m really struggling sometimes a video can give me the key to a bit I really can’t get my head around.

  • Videos definitely help and this one was great! Then it’s hands-on learning for me. I usually start a new project at least three or four times before I get in the groove.

  • Clear step-by-step instructions. I often start by reading instructions and if that isn’t clear go to videos (YouTube, yay!). Nothing like seeing something! It’s also helpful to learn about common mistakes and tips for success (don’t make creme patissiere in an aluminum pot, it will grey; at a certain point Italian meringue buttercream will look curdled, persevere). And no substitute for just plunging in! I am still struggling with two-color brioche, casting on for the twenty-seven eleventh time!! Making progress but something I can’t fix (yet) still happens, so unraveling again. Sigh.

  • I am fortunate to be a part of a group of knitters( and more) who are always ready for a question. We met online and zoom weekly and have our self-run retreat in the middle of the country. What a great group to go to !

  • Love how-to videos or an experienced knitter to knit along with. Thank you for making your video. I knit brioche ages ago and look forward to getting back into it. I have an unfinished brioche blanket that I didn’t know how to pick up again without a visible mark – I might start over now, with your help!

  • I tend to rely on YouTube when I’m trying something new, particularly with knitting.

  • Videos and practice

  • I taught myself to knit years (and years) ago with a little green book studying it’s illustrations. Now, wow, a quick Google search and a YouTube video has not failed me yet! I’m excited to add Brioche to my knitting world. How nice to have something new to learn in a such an easy fashion!

  • All the modalities, visual, aural, kinesthetic in combination help, developing muscle memory is what makes it happen in the end.

  • Good step by step written instructions, a video, life-lines and patience!

  • If I’m having trouble mastering pretty much anything, I find a YouTube video that shows what to do, be it knitting, new technology, using my sewing machine….anything!

  • I am quite experienced in brioche work but your video is so meditative and calming. Beautifully filmed and the “rolls” on the clapper! As your video catalogue increases, will you move on to bagels, calzones, gnocchi, and other “rolled” edibles? Steam rollers, hair rollers, rolling pins? I’ll stop now but you know others will pop to mind. Thanks for a lovely first video….from this non-zoomer fan of all things MDK.

  • If I can’t figure it out myself, i always find a video to show me.

  • YouTube video’s have been a godsend. I’m a BOOK person, and believe in the power of the written word, but OMG, I have been able to do lots more things successfully via DIY videos from the internet than from the same DIY books. And you can’t believe how much it pains me to write that!

    • Also, was going to start the Honeycomb Scarf, read the instructions in the field guide, kind of thought “huh?”, and am THRILLED to read there will be a video. I think I’ll hold out for that!

  • Photos and drawings for some reason work better for me than videos. Maybe because the movements in a video are too fast? I should try watching in slow motion.

  • Video,video,video – if I can see it, I can do it (usually). Love being able to slow down the video and watch in slow motion.

  • Photographs really don’t help me. Video is the starting point for me. But the new skill takes root after much practice and making the mistakes.

  • I am a multi sensory learner so reading, seeing and doing all work for me.

    • Practice! Practice, practice! And rewriting directions in my own words are helpful!

  • I always turn to YouTube to learn a new technique or to freshen up my memory on one that I have done before some time ago. Watching the hand maneuvers while someone is explaining a technique as it is being done is my favorite way to learn. And watching more than one YouTube video on the same topic is especially helpful because you can always pick up a little something from another person’s perspective.

  • It depends on what task I am trying to do, but for knitting I definitely like watching a video ask I attempt the technique.

  • A combination of video and books. The videos do make things easier.

  • Videos on YouTube for complicated stuff but sometimes I pull out my Evie Rosen “teach yourself to knit” for simple stuff.

  • For a new technique I usually search out a video, as well as written descriptions. Then it is practice, practice, practice!

  • YouTube of new stitch while meddles in hand.

  • I always go to YouTube videos to learn new skills!

  • My first go-to is one of the knitting designers or vendors, such as MDK, that has great videos, and depending on the complexity of the technique, I’ll likely go to my knitting library. I have also taken classes online.

  • I tend to be impatient with videos and usually prefer written directions and/or illustrations.

  • If at first I don’t succeed…….lots of tinking, and reading, and then looking up a video!

  • Best is a combination of video and written instructions.

  • I’m definitely a visual learner. Video tutorials have been my safety net any number of times. They have helped me through many “Oh my goodness, now what?” moments. Written instructions only get me so far.

  • Your tutorials! Also You tube is a great help for learning anything new.

  • To learn a new technique, or refresh on an old one, a video or written instructions with diagrams AND quiet are what works for me!

  • A supportive audience

  • Meeting with my weekly knit group. Checking in with my knit buddies solves all!

  • To me there is a certain amount of !!!i got it!!! reading & figuring out a new pattern. One of my other favorite ways to learn is in a small group. although i’m not much of a gadget person, it is wonderful! to have youtube to remind me what i am doing. I plan to teach a knitting class at church in the fall & these folk will be introduced to youtube for sure:)

  • My computer watching videos or YouTube with yarn and needles in my hands. The fact that I can stop the video or go back to any part of it really helps me.

  • Videos take the mystery out of written patterns and build confidence and skill – “See one, do one, teach one”. It’s lovely that one can find so many useful videos and video snippets that are focused on a specific technique. Videos are the encyclopedia and almanacs of my youth.

  • LOVE the behind-the-scenes photos and description!!! You all are such pros and so appreciated.

  • Looking for a video – and then practice, practice, practice.

  • I really find that a visual aid gets me over the hump with learning a new skill. You Tube videos are great for new to me knitting techniques when in-person classes are not practical.

  • Experimenting, and youtube videos. 🙂

  • I’m an old timer — started knitting when there was no such thing as a circular needle!!! until recently I wanted all the helpful instructions in written form, but I’m slowly learning to understand and really appreciate the flexibility of YouTube — you can teach an old dog new tricks!

  • Definitely hands on while watching a video.

  • The way I learn depends on what I am doing, most of the time it’s video but sometimes, as in Kitchener stitch, I need written instructions to follow step by step.

  • Video, and practice!

  • Thank you for he lounge. I decided to knit the stepping stone throw but had never done entrelac before. I was sure I was doing it wrong at the start but with some encouragement, I was able to trust I was doing it right. And voila!

  • Reading, watching, doing.

  • I rely on how-to videos when I’m trying to master a new techniques. I so appreciate that people take the time to make them!

  • I still love written instructions with illustrations.

  • Well written instructions, with good clear pictures. And every so often I will watch how to videos .

  • Visual, visual, visual! My memory can recall a picture of instruction so much easier than a string of words.

  • Video tutorials. I can figure out many things, but when I can’t I need to see someone doing it.

  • Definitely YouTube videos that show and talk you through the steps. Whenever I’m not sure how to do something, I look up a YouTube video (sometimes more than one to find one that works for me).

  • Seeing a video where I can stop and watch again and again is the best help.

  • I learn best by watching and doing, so generally look for well produced videos. I especially like when the teacher shows what can go wrong and how to fix it, as I’m certain to make mistakes.

  • You-tube is my most often go to for help.

  • Sitting next to someone who can knit (or whatever) along with me. That way they can stop me when I make a mistake and show me how to fix it.

  • I use videos for everything. Diagrams and written instructions don’t help. I never could have done Judy’s magic cast on without a video. And the same for brioche. With your help in the video I can now knit the cushiest cowl.

  • take it slow with deep breaths, then just practice step by step until there is a rhythm to it. if i get frustrated i take a break and come back to it.

  • Videos are the most helpful for me!

  • You Tube combined with actually doing it. Just watching isn’t enough–I have to feel my way through it as well.

  • I was hoping this post was going to show out takes and bloopers! I could’ve used a laugh this morning. I watch the Tubes of You and I have to see the technique demonstrated by a “thrower” not a “picker”. So sometimes I have to search awhile. The best teacher I’ve found is Jen AC. I sure miss her.

  • Written instructions with pictures are great, but sometimes only a video will do!

  • I’m definitely a visual learner. YouTube videos are a great help to me when learning something new.

  • For knitting, my knitting group helps the most. Cooking, if I can’t get it from reading or watching YouTube, I will pay for a class.

  • Brilliant!

  • Videos definitely help me, and as you said with needles in hands!
    Patience also helps a lot!

  • To learn a new skill, I need to read and study slowly and quietly. I can watch a video as long as I have the written steps in the procedure.

  • You Tube! I need to see as I work along.

  • Book learner here!

  • Early morning sunlight, quietness and tea!

  • Written text, still images (in good focus without strong nail polish colors interfering) and my needles in hand. Watching videos & trying to follow along drives me crazy!! Two needles in hand and possibly some slippery stitches do not make it easy to be hitting the space bar when I need to stop, restart, or review a move. Sorry.

  • YouTube and I are good friends when I need to either learn or refresh my memory on a stitch. LOVE videos!

  • Wow! This video makes sense to me! Thank you for the help! I love your informational guidance!

  • I love a video that is well-lit and includes a calm voice-over for knitting techniques, but for cooking I find that I’m better off with written directions and a series of photos.

  • youtube!

  • I find video very helpful, but I have to be following along trying to do it at same time.

  • Utube is my first choice. I have also brought my questions to my local yarn shop.

  • Video or working with someone who can show me. I am a visual learner and seeing the process is key.

  • Clearly written instructions with pictures!

  • YouTube every time! I need to see it being done

  • Videos definitely help and are my first go to now. Well written instructions and detailed illustrations also help. And can never forget practice, practice, practice.

  • Video helps a lot!!! I also remind myself that my first try is just that! The next one will be better!

  • I use videos, and do at the same time. Which means there’s lots of pausing, rewinding, and trying again 🙂

  • You Tube but I’ve learned that for me the 3rd time is the key. I usually have to try something new 3 times and then it “clicks”

  • I can usually master something from written instructions, having knit for decades pre-internet, but a well-made vidéo sure helps!

  • YouTube with the caveat that I stick to known or “expert” sites. There are so many out there that are ok but definitely not as easy to follow or as clear in their instructions.

  • Seeing a video and trying it at the same time really helps. A picture is worth a thousand words.

  • Watching a video is helpful….just seeing the steps and the result of each step is helpful to know you’re on the right track and to troubleshoot where you may have gone awry.

  • Videos! I am so visual!

  • YouTube and Patience !

  • I have had the privilege of learning from several first class knitting teachers over the years. They are the best! YouTube is a distant second place.

  • Video is a huge help. And then I just have to start knitting or cooking or whatever and see what happens.

  • I like to watch something being done and then try it myself. I am more of a hands-on gal!

  • Good clear instructions and practiciting a technique on swatches before embarking on a project.

  • Videos from you folks, YouTube, designers, coupled with clearly written directions. This works for cooking as well as knitting as some techniques need that visual-in-action.

  • Video!!

  • I need a combination of written instructions and still photos.

  • Youtube instructional videos

  • Close up video where the needles and stitches are clearly seen. Nothing worse than than rapid long distance views. Clear, up close, slow and repeat. Why it’s done that way helps me to understand the method so I can apply it elsewhere. MDK already knows that. Thank you

  • When I was learning brioche, I took Nancy Marchant’s class in Craftsy, then I also watched Stephen West in Knit Stars noting all his tips and tricks- very helpful. I also had to use YouTube when learning how to do the finger prick for diabetes.

  • Short videos help the most when trying to figure out how to do a task, whether it be brioche knitting or taking apart my vacuum cleaner. 🙂

  • For knitting new kinds of stiches, at least 3 different you tube tutorials, then I do it while watching one. So far: success!

  • You Tube videos have been a really great help for me learning new techniques. I appreciate all the people who have taken the time to post those.

  • YouTube and written instructions work best for me. I like to watch a video a few times, then read through instructions, and then try doing whatever I’m trying to learn.

  • Just jumping in and doing. Videos are great to give you a start.

  • Couldn’t agree more with your advice in the intro above — grabbing needles and yarn and watching a well-made video (like yours — BRAVO!) are the way to go for me.

    Thank you for getting me over my FOB (Fear of Brioche). I am engrossed in my first brioche project right now and plan to share your video with my knitting friends.

  • For knitting I need it all… video, still pictures or photos, descriptions! At least when my brain is being challenged.

  • I first learned from my Mom, and that was the best! These days, books or online sources with clear photos or drawings with text, breaking down the steps. Techknitter is a favorite, as well as right here of course!

  • Usually I’ll try it from whatever written instructions I have it that doesn’t work or i want to check myself I’ll look for a video. I also have the members of a large guild to check in with someone, or more likely many someones have already tried whatever is giving me trouble.

  • YouTube always! Written instructions/descriptions are nice, but seeing it in video makes it that much easier to understand!

  • Clear photo tutorials, and if that fails, YouTube video. I find a lot of videos have too much extraneous content. I understand the need for title and intro segments, but sometimes I just want the information on How To Do The Thing. Give me the TikTok version: short and sweet!

    • Hands on practice guided in person or with a video on which I can see someone else’s hands is best

  • For many, many years I was convinced that I learned best from a book or written instructions. Of course part of that is because I was born well before YouTube, so I didn’t have as much choice. Still, rather than seek out a professional lesson or a skilled friend, I would rely on books to learn so many things. Now I am older and wiser and realize that YouTube and similar paid and more targeted videos and classes are such a gift! Seeing someone navigate a tricky technique or clarify some challenge in your knitting or other craft is just eye-opening. I also find it extremely relaxing to watch knitting or watercolor painting videos – there’s something about seeing someone working on something beautiful that is quite soothing

  • Videos make quick learning for me. Nice job on your first video, thanks for behind the scene peak!

  • I spent most of my life in the last century, so the new way of educating oneself, with YouTube and pod casts, is so wonderful and fresh. When I’m stuck – as in how to knit a knit 1 – below – I dial up a couple or three YouTubes, and figure it out with the help of others. This is a good part of the 21st century.

  • Visual support always helps!

  • Photos with stitch definition which helps with how it should look if done correctly. Videos help with yarn placement and direction of hand movement. Written direction I usually try first with a list of abbreviations close by.

  • I love video! Watching the video as I work along is the best for me. I can stop it, slow it down or repeat it as many times as necessary.

  • I do well with written instructions. Also need to be patient with myself and to keep practicing.

  • Excellent video and very clear instructions. Thanks MDK team!!!

  • Clear written instructions along with a video

  • I do much better with visual aides then reading directions. I need to see how something is done to be able to replicate it.

  • MDK Skillset App, book and YouTube!

  • Whenever I need to figure out how to do something: brioche, join new fibre when spinning, how to fold a fitted sheet, how to put caulking around the sink, YouTube is my source. Love video – also love brioche. I haven’t knit anything with brioche for a while so this might just be the inspiration I need.

  • I think videos help the most. I am definitely a visual learner. Looking forward to the Honeycomb scarf!

  • How-to videos work great when run at a slower speed, but switch the sound off first or you will be so distracted by the lower pitch!

  • MDK Lounge and YouTube!

  • What an extremely fun glimpse! I’ve wondered about camera/lights setup for how-to knitting videos. Personally I love a step by step photo/words instruction set— but I am coming to appreciate excellent videos and the ability to just pause them!

  • Google is my best friend. I prefer written instructions with pictures over videos. That way I can skip to the parts I need.

  • Seeing (action video), hearing, doing… And your video lines up with all three.

    In the case of brioche, I will be focused a lot on the doing. It is going to take a few test swatches.

    Also a commitment to be focused on the knitting. Brioche is rather unforgiving of mistakes. I have the same challenge when I knit lace. That said, there is a point with the brioche cowl where it does become repetitive in a way that lace sometimes does not.

  • It depends on the craft. For knitting, videos are my go-to. My poor library of reference books feels totally abandoned. For crafts that I’m new at, there’s nothing like an in-person class. I’m determined to learn to sew, but even after 2 beginner classes I don’t feel ready to try even simple clothing on my own. That’s why I’m starting a 4-week Sewing from Commercial Patterns class this afternoon!

  • Reading through a description, then watching a video. YouTube has sure been a game changer, and not just for knitting!

  • YouTube has been a great tool in learning new techniques or crafts. I’m a visual person so a good video is ideal. Good written instructions are also appreciated.

  • Sometimes I need video and sometimes step-by-step pictures with directions are enough – but either way I have to be trying it myself at the same time! Then it’s just a matter of repetition and practice. But for some techniques I still have to pull out instructions to follow if I don’t do them often (a variety of cast-on and bind-offs usually).

  • I do like a good video. Usually one that’s well made saves a lot of trial and error.

  • Video is my go to as I like to be able to stop and “rewind” many times as I’m learning. But I also love a simple, skill-building pattern that is really cute, inspiring me to press on so I can wear it! Cushiest cowl in Atlas colors + video = perfect combo in my world.

  • A good video – charts – you name it! Sometimes just reading step by step. Actually taking a class such as in basket weaving. Fun times taking a class instead of giving one.

  • Lots and lots of videos! And ones that go slowly enough for you to do the stitch without trying to hold your yarn and needles and hit the pause/rewind button all at he same time. Oh and videos that make sure the part you need to see is actually in the frame!

  • Video with clear narration. And practice. Your brioche video was great!
    I was distracted by the knitting so close to the tips of the needles. Your knitter is waaaay more talented than I will ever be. I would have dropped the whole row if I tried to knit that close to the tips of my needles.

  • I’ve always enjoyed the traditional approaches to learning a new craft: learning from someone else informally or in a class, or a good book of techniques with clear, detailed photos. Now that you can find so many good videos online, I prefer to combine books and videos for a convenient, self-paced experience.

  • Youtube – don’t know how I figured things out before it existed.

  • I love YouTube ….pausing, rewinding, pausing rewinding until it sinks in!

  • This video!! I believe this got me over that mysterious hump for brioche!!! THANK YOU!

  • I find videos that demonstrate techniques very helpful.

  • Clear concise directions, good diagrams and a short to the point video.

  • YouTube videos.

  • As the 237th poster, all I can say is…what they said!

  • When learning a new technique well done videos are helpful. But I’m also prepared to make mistakes and learn from them. I do like to charge myself with new skills in my knitting.

  • Video instruction covers all the bases – visual, auditory, and rewind/pause so that I can duplicate the action.

  • Reading through a patterns instructions several times in order to let it percolate in my brain. But what is clear instructions to one is not always the case for me. So next is the convenience of videos on my phone! Practice is present at all stages; tinking until I get it right!

  • Video is the biggest help. Back in the dark ages I used books — and sometimes live people.

  • I love to just try it on my own first, or watch a 3 min video.. just enough to feel a little more confident!

  • Well Written Instructions are my preferred method of learning a thing. But a video with clear pictures and narration comes in second, and I am always grateful for one when the instructions are not well-written, or nonexistent.

  • Seeing the stitch done slowly while I have needles in my hands!

  • Reading, doing-seeing-doing, and especially a mnemonic for anything repeated. A pleasant voice on the video really helps (yay, Kay!). It’s always nice when the video includes an extra hint or trick besides the actual showing of the technique – that the sl1yo is a shawl around the “shoulders” of the slipped stitch was my brioche epiphany moment!

  • Books, videos, and practice!

  • Combination of YouTube, written and experienced knitters.

  • I like to use as many resources as are available. Sometimes video is the best way, sometimes needles and yarn in hand with a book on my lap are the answer! Learning style has a lot to do with Hal you gain the information you need.

  • Being able to watch a video is always the best option when you can’t have someone there to teach you. Thanks for your great videos.

  • Video. Video. Video. Used video to reteach myself to knit years ago. My son is using video (and your book) to teach himself to knit. And YEA! I’ve done a third of the brioche cowel with only one boo-boo. My first ever brioche project. Thank you, thank you for the push to try something new and the helping hand to make it less intimidating.

  • I love the “any time, any place” aspects of a good video for anything I want to learn.

  • Video or still photos of how it is done

  • Definitely videos, yours are great! Also like Very Pink

  • I like tutorials, whether on a video, or in a classroom setting. I am also a self taught knitter, and I read (and buy) patterns, just to learn new to me techniques. I learned to weave by reading library books over and over, then purchasing a 36” four shaft loom in a kit forty years ago. But I still take weaving classes to learn more!

  • I like to read the instructions 2 or 3 times, then try it out, then reread!

  • I am a visual learner and I prefer videos before anything else when learning something new. Photographs if done well and in clear steps would be my second choice, but audio only–Forgetaboutit! Thanks for this excellent video.

  • I still find a written article or book most helpful when learning any new technique. Allows me to speed or skip over parts/ steps that are easy to me and linger my eyes as long as I need on the particular parts totally new or difficult. Videos are next choice, but have to replay those sticky parts over and over as they sometimes go by too fast.

  • I’m a visual learner, so videos & YouTube.

  • Videos are great – especially when you can pause/rewind as needed. In-person is good, too, but it’s nice to have video to go back to, whether while learning or needing to brush up on a technique.

  • OMGosh, I am making the wristlets – started the 2nd one last night – using Clementine and a skein of lovely undyed white Cormo yarn from our local farm – Creamsicle colors indeed! The two yarns are working perfectly together. FG 21 helped me learn brioche with only 4 false starts 🙂

    Clearly written instructions are my best friend, and tips and instructions from the MDK team are priceless. My other favorite sources for inspiration and how-to are Fruity Knitting (love Andrea’s explanations for the alterations and techniques she uses) and Jen Arnall-Culliford’s books and videos. Thank you to all you great teachers out there!

  • I need a visual. This brioche video was immensely helpful.

  • I use videos on line and I like written instructions also, especially when accompanied by drawings of the steps described.

  • I read through the instructions and try it out – trial and error are the first step. If I have trouble, I then move on to a search for a clear, non-nonsense video tutorial that gets right to the point.

  • A combination of videos and detailed pattern instructions and illustrations.

  • hmm… hit or miss? really, clean and clear written instructions. When they aren’t, then I search for a video, guess I am old school.

  • Watch someone and take notes that I can sit with and experiment.
    Thanks for the giveaway chance!

  • I like some quiet, to read written directions all the way through before starting (longtime nurse habit reinforced by knitting), then a soothing video, preferably voiced over by a midwestern gal with major knitting chops & a background in dog sweaters, blankets, & law.

  • My go to help is usually a book for cooking, a book and video for something visual, like knitting, putting chainsaw helmet together, or watching a person do it. Thank you Henry Tech Doc for demo on how to clean the power plug on this IPad.

  • A friend sitting right beside me!

  • How to videos and written instructions. Sometimes diagrams help too.

  • I had already started the Cushiest Cowl after I saw Nancy Marchant’s interview on another POD cast. And also watching Stephen West. But watching your video really made a difference. I can’t wait for the next one.

  • I prefer an in-person or online class. I often learn quite a bit from the questions of others.

  • Videos! Plus endless practice …

  • Watch a video, with yarn and needles in hand. Repeat. Make notes to use as I continue.

  • The first place I go for a really new technique is a video. But if it’s one I tried long ago, and I need to remember it, I first look on my computer, because I save lots of notes and links. Books and written patterns, these days, are only for the details of making a specific project.

  • Having the right supplies and a really good teacher!

  • Videos. I have learned so much knitting from YouTube, even though I have the “books”. Seeing it actually done makes all the difference for me. Whenever anyone asks me to teach them to knit, I refer them to videos. They have a pause function and unlimited attention and patience!

  • Videos are the most helpful!

  • YouTube is .my go to for knitting, Potter, or just about anything. Needless at the ready and off I go over &over until I can handle what I’m learning. I keep that YouTube on speed dial every time need a refresher.

  • Videos are the most helpful for me.

  • Words with pictures help a lot; and the best videos (concise, and close-up) can help as well.

  • I do tons of research and read all about the technique!

  • Gosh, two things really. One, when I’ve done KALs here, the answers have been amazing and helpful. Two, when I recently had an “oops” in a project, I took it to a lovely LYS and the owner helped me fix it right up and showed me what had happened.

  • I’m a visual learner so any time that I don’t remember how to do a technique or am learning something new. I turn to videos. So happy to see you doing one on brioche knitting. I don’t quite get all the in and outs. So I will definitely be watching.

  • Video is great for the first go round, but after that I like concise written instructions. I can read so much faster than I can watch.

  • Videos and practice work best for me

  • I am a book learner. When the zombie apocalypse comes and the internet dies, I will knit on through all crises, undeterred.

  • It helps me so much to take a class and be with other people trying the new skill, we all come from different experiences and I appreciate all the thoughtful questions that I didn’t even think of!

  • best help ever … look it up on utube! there’s great help on any technique to use at any time.

  • One of the things are dislike about videos of knitting are those who focus on the hands while they are explaining something. It’s a little tic, I see the needles tapping while I wait. I presume that your videos can focus on the person when talking before beginning knitting. And to get to the topic at hand right away. I don’t need a five minute preamble.

  • Focus, read carefully and make a stitch. Repeat until my hands get it.

  • I’m a classic words with drawings learner, but these days I always check for videos as well.

  • A quiet space and a cup of tea.

  • I agree with the “watch the video with needles in hand” technique you mention above.

  • Videos help me

  • The most useful thing I’ve been told, both for learning something and teaching others:
    I hear, I forget
    I see, I remember
    I do, I understand

  • I actually prefer written tutorials with photos, they are much faster. Although short videos are also useful, especuially for more complicated techniques.

  • For me the more senses involved the better. I’ll read the directions, watch the video with needles and yarn following along with the instructions.

  • Videos, hands down…no…needles up!

  • I have tons of books, but I have to admit I turn to videos when I want to learn something new.

  • Videos are the only way I have learned to knit, having started just before the pandemic began. YouTube has been my teacher and good friend. So thank you for this video- makes all the difference for visual learners!

  • When a friend taught me to knit (quite a few moons ago), I caught on faster sitting next to her. Her patience helped considerably! Same with learning cooking with my Mom. (Also considerable patience…I sense a theme!) Videos serve a similar purpose today, although there’s no one here to take my needles and show me where I went wrong. I miss that.

  • My internet is questionable at best, so I can’t depend on you tube. I use a well written and illustrated book most often.

  • Being able to see the technique done. I learned brioche from Nancy Marchant’s Craftsy Class. Was unsuccessful from her book.

  • I love YouTube University first. Then I like written instructions that I can keep in my bag and refer to throughout the project.

  • University of YouTube

  • Usually a video for an idea of the steps and flow and then written instructions to refer to as I execute.

  • First, I try to figure it out myself, then I go to YouTube to find videos to teach me. Thank God for YouTube and all of the wonderful knitters who contribute to my learning new things!

  • I can usually figure out a pattern by reading it a couple of times. But the brioche stitch took actually picking up the needles and doing it. The honeycomb stitch I fell in love with but for some reason the first few times it never looked like the pictures of the finished scarf. Finally just step by step it turned out. Yeah!

  • Combining visual, auditory, print with yarns and needle in hand- all on repeat until mastered….work on it and enjoy it daily until able to relax even while concentrating enough to avoid making mistakes

  • I check YouTube for about four different instructional videos to watch when encountering a new technique. It’s how I learned to knit. Now that I belong to a knitting group I run it by them when we meet for additional help.

  • Definitely having my LYS owners/staff who are always ready to help when needed. Also, knowing most techniques are just a YouTube video away is super helpful if I need a reminder.

  • Videos are my favorite tool when learning or re-learning a new skill! The Brioche video is so incredibly helpful! I LOVE knitting brioche I’ve already completed one cushy cowl, one cotton dishcloth, and am in progress with my 2nd Cushiest Cowl!!!!!!

  • I love watching a video or seeing photos that are shot from the perspective of the demonstrator so that it shows what the project will look like in my hands.

  • Videos to accompany instructions are invaluable!

  • I find YouTube videos very helpful but I also need to practice and rip out, then do it again….and on and on until I get it.

  • For me, there’s no substitute for a live person – even if they’re just there to provide emotional support. I recently learned to crochet at a free class held at a LYS. I’ve seen videos galore, but just having the teacher there gave me the confidence to finally cement the motions in my head!

  • I tried to leave a comment in the video for Brioche. When you go in color B the yarn was already in the front( yellow) and should not be in the back, when you bring it to the front like they do in the video, it creates a loop over the edge, you will see it in the next row. It should be coming from the front to make the brioche first purl.

  • Practice for me

  • I like to read words (and pictures) and then move on to video. sometimes it is hard to find a good video. Love yours.

  • Watching a well done video is a huge help when learning something new. You can replay and review it as many times as you need and is always a good refresher.

  • I like a combination of things to help master a new skill, but definitely videos on line plus user notes and comments (such as Ravelry project notes and the MDK lounge). Picked up many a helpful tip from other knitters that way!

  • Allison’s video is extremely helpful and I love how the video is so complete! I usually look at one of my knitting books to learn something new and then watch a video. I could never have learned brioche from a book.

  • I try to read through the directions to try to get an understanding of what lies ahead. Then I am off and running – while I am a visual learner and having written instructions is a good thing – there’s nothing like doing. Getting that muscle memory. Sometimes in this day and age of technology I find that I still need a video if it’s a difficult concept for me to grasp. The bottom line is to just keep on going.

  • Detailed description in text and photos. Videos are great at times – but I want to scan written descriptions at my own speed.

  • I find videos to be the most help when I am trying to learn new techniques. I first used the ones that are part of Craftsy classes.
    Once that program began experimenting with other formats, I went onto YouTube to find multiple videos out there for the techniques I wanted to.learn.

    Next, I made my way to several knitting blogs; Grocery Girls, Fruity Knitting and I’ll Knit if I Want to. These blogs gave additional information and produced some videos.

    While in the hospital with my Ipad for company I found MDK. Your Website is a treasure trove of inspiration and resources.
    Being part of a knitting community is wonderful encouragement to keep growing my skills and building confidence to try new things. Thank you.

    Nancy D.
    Buffalo, MN

  • I’m so excited that you are including videos with the brioche knitting projects from the field guide. I hope they will help me overcome FOBK (fear of brioche knitting) because I’m dying to make the squishy cowl and the honeycomb scarf!

  • Watching videos and then following along on the 2nd go-around.

  • A well-written pattern/recipe/instructions, etc. Then I just have to try it, line by line, and figure it out for myself. My mind often can’t make heads or tails of what to do next, so I just knit and somehow it works out. (Mostly. If not, then I rip back and try again!)

  • Written instructions, and a buddy. Either doing it together, learning from them, or someone in the same room doing their own thing.

  • Visual tips. Watching the skill/technique & hearing the steps spoken

  • Videos are super helpful. If a written pattern doesn’t seem to make sense, watching that section of a video will almost certainly clear it up.

  • A well written pattern, or recipe, and YouTube.

  • Resources & practice are my best tools when I’m learning something new!

  • visual supports help.

  • I use video the most: seeing and hearing!

  • Youtube instructions!

  • Visual references to the techniques broken down into steps, helps me the most.

  • YouTube is great but sometimes when it is I prefer photos of each stage.

  • Video Video Video – I rewind again and again and noone gets frustrated with me.

  • What supports me when I am trying to learn a knitting technique is definitely videos. I learn by watching. Thank you for this tutorial on Brioche. So helpful.

  • Video plus written step by step instructions for hands on.

  • First I read about it and if I don’t get it I search for a video

  • Try and try again

  • Definitely videos!

  • My go to place is videos because the book illustrations are not helpful at all. They try to but more than one action in one drawing etc. Very bade and we pay good money for something we must get advice elsewhere. I would be lost without Youtube.

  • I’m knitting my first Marie Wallin Cardigan. I’m going to fairisle in the flat that I have never done. I have watched her videos many times as well as he instructions. It’s a challenge for me but I’m willing to do it. Thanks

  • You tube videos and the support and guidance from my knitting friends help.

  • I like to have a goal, especially a visual goal. Then I learn best from videos. One of my favorite knitting teachers on YouTube is Suzanne Bryan, a TKGA Master Hand Knitter.

  • Hands on practice! I use both written and visual aids but learn best from actually doing it:)

  • Solitude and YouTube! That sounds contradictory….

  • I work best from clear, written, instructions. Sometimes I may need a diagram too – but diagrams without words are a foreign language to me. A very good, slow video may also help clarify the words, but it’s the words that I need to keep and refer back to.

  • Ha! Reading, breathing, googling for videos, being prepared. Going slowly, on steps at a time. Lifelines and fearless ripping out to try again!

  • YouTube!

  • Video: YouTube is a game changer! ❤️

  • Written instructions with pictures that I can knit along with. Videos are great but move too fast for me to keep up when knitting at the same time.

  • Video and repetition. Do it again until it clicks.

  • Videos (some even in slow motion) to help master hand movements and yarn manipulation. I also take notes in my knitting journal for things I notice when I’m actually doing the technique that I could forget about having to do (like slipping a stitch in a pattern as an example). Once I have watched the video first a few times and then it’s practice practice practice. If it’s a technique that I am struggling to master I also will do a practice swatch.

  • clearly written instructions, step by step followed by practice practice pratice1

  • Youtube, & the many online illustrated tutorials have been lifesavers to me in my journey of learning new techniques in crafting – so many talented people willingly share their expertise!!

  • You tube

  • Practice, try try and try again

  • Videos (no chat, please, just clear, move-by-move descriptions) + written instructions + practice + patience!

  • Watching a video and pages of instructions! I’m a visual learner. Thanks for all you do!

  • Good books, my Knitting Anonymous stitch sisters, and I CAN DO IT mantra.

  • I start with written instructions and drawings or diagrams mostly by default, having learned to knit pre YouTube. I do use videos and especially links from pattern designers for their patterns to learn new techniques.

  • Video for sure. Love being able to go back and re-watch that one bit where I just don’t know where to wrap the yarn. Your video is great but holy cats, your Steady Knitting Hands really leaves her stitches right at the end of her left hand needle!!! It was stressful to watch, worrying she was going to drop a stitch!

  • Video

  • Since I learned to knit by the book many many decades ago (as that was all available) I love being able to look at videos by trusted sources like MDK

  • Persistence with the willingness to rip it out and start again!

  • I, too, like videos that start off slowly and are repetitive enough that I can understand the process.

  • What helps me the most is a video demonstration. Thank you!

  • Videos and zoom classes

  • ummmmm- Maybe it IS doable.

  • I find video really helpful. I often turn off the sound so I can watch repeatedly until I have it.

  • I always love a visual! Video was great and I can’t wait for the Honeycomb one!!!

  • YouTube videos mostly, but in person help is better if available.

  • Having learned to knit & crochet as a child over 50 years ago (when how you learned wasn’t a thing), I learned from example & learned to read patterns & figure it out. Now that YouTube is at my fingertips, I’m a visual learner.

  • Written step by step instructions with illustrations. I always search for non-video tutorials. (Sorry!)

  • Of course one on one instruction is always the best BUT I’ve learned to like YouTube how to videos when learning or relearning a technique. It’s really helpful to be able to rewind and rewatch tricky bits.

  • Usually, we’ll written instructions. Occasionally, a video.

  • I look for clear tutorials, video and printed. Of course if you have someone who can do hands on showing you how to do it, that’s priceless.

  • People!

  • ooooo, I want to do something w/ brioche!!! I learn best visually. And doing it while watching.

  • kits and videos that go with them!

  • Love a good video! But then I have to do it and usually several times.

  • What did I do before YouTube help? Guess and then convince myself I had it. Looooove video help!

  • Videos, by far!

  • Sometimes videos, sometimes written instructions, and always practice works for me. In-person instruction works less well- I think I get performance anxiety…

  • A video in technique will often get me “unstuck”. Also, notes on Ravelry from others who’ve knit the project can be quite helpful.

  • I use You Tube a lot for knitting techniques, as well as bookmarked pages from MDK. Jen Arnall-Culliford and Patty Lyons are MDK go to’s. For cooking, use Video, and when I can, my Mom!

  • I’m a visual learner so seeing the technique done, slowly and clearly, is best for me.

  • I keep trying. If I have trouble, I look for online instructions or videos. In the Before Times, I would have asked a friend, of course.

  • I learn best by doing. Show me. I’ll follow your lead. But then, I have to do it again. And again. So, a tutorial to refer back to helps best. (One without unnecessary chatter as I’ll replay it numbers times.) I don’t really like pictorial instructions in a book that I have to interpret. For me, hands on is best, hands down!

  • Video is very helpful but still need practice! Brioche is a mystery to me so I will be watching this video- thanks!

  • Definitely videos

  • classical music

  • Having the time to do it properly.

  • I ask friends for their expertise in knitting and cooking. We can often noodle out the problem one way or another.

  • The supports that help me most are clear video(with or without low music) and with clear audio instructions. Then, being able to bounce the idea off of friends who can provide further trips and tricks. It’s all about the stretching of knowledge until the new learning becomes comfortable.

  • Very clear instructions with videos or photos.

  • Video combined with hands on. Needs good explanation (verbal and actual process) that is not rushed.

  • I usually learn best through diagrams and written descriptions, but occasionally videos help as well.

  • When I need to learn something new or revisit a technique, I rely on videos and blogs. I find it super helpful to see someone’s hands making an SSK or bind off, especially if they hold their needles as I do. This newsletter is another resource, both inspirational and technical. But if all that fails, I call Sarah. : )

  • Repeated watching of YouTube videos!

  • What helps me the most are video snippets so I can watch a “live” demonstration! Aren’t all knitters visual learners?! 🙂

  • Practice, Messing up and starting again. And again.

  • I love watching videos of new techniques then I practice, practice, practice! For brioche, I did take a course a while back so when I finally worked up the nerve to actually do it, I brushed up by watching some videos then dove right in. Seriously, I don’t know what I was so afraid of – it’s SO fun and actually pretty straightforward. Thanks for an awesome giveaway!

  • I like learning a new knitting technique by first studying and attempting with a written description. Then I like to watch a video, just to make certain I’m doing it correctly. Somehow, I never need videos with new cooking techniques. I think my brain has a harder time telling my hands what to do. No kinesthetic awareness.

  • Clear instructions with good pictures to reference

  • Supports? Video, for sure. I hope never to test this with something like, say, a home appendectomy, but my mirror neurons soak up the moving visuals.

  • Being able to pause and rewind the video while I knit along!

  • A video with slow and deliberate instruction – not so fast that I have to rewind multiple times

  • A moving visual of some kind! I have wonderful reference books with tons of illustrations dating back to my mom’s copy of The Good Housekeeping Needle Craft Encyclopedia (1950 ed.). But when I was trying to learn to purl, I couldn’t get it until my best friend’s British mom showed me. Thank goodness for video tutorials!! BTW, this one is very well done. Don’t EVER take it down.

  • You tube. You can find great instructional videos there. Some of them I have to watch a few times before I catch on though. Lol

  • Over the past decade as I’ve become far less mobile, what has helped me the most when I’m learning a new skill or technique is feedback from people I’ve never met. First on my blog, then on twitter. I don’t count my followers or check my stats on social media, but I’ll tell you what – those little hearts and comments/critiques when I post a painting (me! painting!) are really helpful.

  • What helps me the most when learning a new skill are video tutorials or a live person watching & assisting me.

  • I find the best way to learn something really well is to teach it to someone else.

  • You tube videos

  • Videos help the most, especially if they are concise and/or indexed. Forget the idle chatter and ads when I am hell bent on simply accomplishing a new or forgotten technique.

  • I always enjoy a video along with written instructions. Works best with this old brain

  • Visual aids support me best, seeing skills in continental knitting and having an abundance of kindness towards myself for stretching my comfort zone!

  • I’m a hands-on person. Videos are helpful, but there’s nothing like in-period experience. I have attended several of Meg Swansen’s Knitting Camps and workshops, and it’s great to have feedback and reinforcement while learning a new technique or trick.

  • Pictures of each step. With pictures I can study each step and duplicate on my needles before I move on to the next step. Videos are okay, but having to stop and start it can be frustrating.

  • Clear pictures for each step.

  • Videos help me the most with knitting help. It’s so great to be able to visualize a technique and then replay as often as needed.

  • When I am trying to learn a new knitting technique, youtube videos are my best friend!

  • YouTube knitorials : ) are the best invention EVER. I can start and stop and go back as many times as I need to until I get the hang of the new stitch I’m trying to learn.

  • I agree that knitting right along with the video is the best way to learn for me! Just jump right in!

  • A good video

  • What best supports me in learning a new technique? An empty house (no interruptions) and quiet (no distractions). Suffice it to say, I’ve not learned any new techniques for anything since March 13, 2020.

  • Videos definitely visual learner here, and doing it myself

  • I watch a video of the technique online over and over.

  • Geez. Is this the longest list of comments ever? Like many others I like a quick, clean video accompanied by clear text and illustrations.

  • I find myself relying more and more on videos. So many helpful options now!

  • Still photos of each step. If necessary, the transition between steps too.

  • Those who encourage me to try and compliment my efforts.

  • Clear written instructions and accompanying pictures. I get impatient with videos…they either move too slow or two fast !

  • Video tutorials are lifesavers, the best!! I usually watch once or twice, then try the technique while watching, in the case of knitting.

  • Videos

  • Already get the newsletter! For brioche I have found videos to be the most help. I can stop and replay as needed. This was especially helpful for decreases.

  • I am a long time “beginner” and, it has taken me some time to realize that video is ever so helpful!

  • you tube videos with placeholders to advance/replay sections

  • Watch lots of videos

  • When I’m working to learn a new technique, such as brioche knitting, it is really helpful to see the written how-to with drawings and also have videos to review.

  • Text and diagrams, mostly, but sometimes videos, I have tried repeatedly to learn brioche over the past 20 years, but it never “sticks,” much like statistics or SQL.

  • YouTube!

  • You Tube and My Yarn Bar friends! When patterns have a video attached it is fabulous!!

  • Generally I prefer a photo tutorial. Videos can be great, but I often have trouble with having to stop and replay steps while my hands are full of yarn and needles.

  • I use either written or video sources.

  • I like videos to help me see the steps for new stitches

  • YouTube is my new teacher for just about anything I’m curious about, especially for the fibre arts! Love your Snippets!!

  • I love instructional videos to learn new concepts — sometimes having written instructions is helpful too, but I’m very much a visual learner.

  • I am a kinesthetic learner so videos are right up my alley. I also need to talk about it so I guess my dogs will be learning about Brioche with me! Oh they just reminded me that they don’t have thumbs, which would make knitting difficult, so they will just listen and offer support. Thanks for a chance to win!

  • You Tube!

  • Honestly, YouTube is the best support. It’s way easier to learn something new when you can see it in action, but with perfect camera angles and the ability to pause and replay it beats any in-person demonstrations by far. It also helps to find a community of people who have the same hobby

  • Brioche always requires me to read and re-read the instructions a few times. Then start and keep going.

  • I can’t survive without YouTube tutorials. Thanks for your videos — they’re great!

  • Visually clear and concise videos work best for me. Viewed with the written instructions next to me to scribble notes.

  • The mantra I rely on when I have to “unknit,” whether I’m tinking or frogging.

    “It’s all knitting.”

    The knitting and the unkniting, it’s all knitting.

  • My superhero knitting friends: Claudia and Bethany. Between the two of them, they seem to know everything about knitting, reading patterns, fixing mistakes, and turning unfixable mistake into design details with character.

  • My fearless nature and belief that if anyone else can do it, so can I

  • Thank you for the Brioche video series. I have Brioche books and have taken a short class and still am afraid of the technique ’til now. I believe your presentation and rhythmic repetition will help me conquer a new skill. Again, thank you.

  • Detailed written instructions are my goto. I will even flesh out instructions given so I don’t have to think when I’m working on my project.

  • Time is my biggest support. I have to try something new a little at a time.

  • Usually for learning new knitting techniques I find YouTube really helpful. And then lots of focused practice, without distraction.

  • Videos

  • I like reading directions with pictures. I am learning to appreciate you tube videos.Eager to learn brioche!

  • Hands on training with an expert

  • It really helps me if I can read a pattern or recipe and then watch/listen an expert do the skill – pause – and then listen/watch as many times as I need to understand.

  • Going to my favorite yarn shop for hands on, or watching YouTube

  • YouTube

  • I still like an old-fashioned book for the reference shelf, but I admit to watching YouTube videos too.

  • I am definitely a visual learner, so videos, videos, videos! Play, Pause, Practice, Rewind, Practice. REPEAT.

  • What helps most to support my trying to master a new technique? My curiosity and drive to keep learning, that and my virtual knitterly friend, Google.

  • The support that helps me the most is to have the directions in writing and to be able to see how it is done. I don’t learn well if I’m only hearing it. Always look forward to your Snippets newsletter.

  • Watching knitting techniques on video sure beats learning from a brochure like I did decades ago!

  • I love turning to YouTube or Instagram for help. There are always amazing videos and I appreciate being able to adjust the speed and replay them.

  • I learn new techniques the best by doing the same steps in time with a video.

  • Definitely videos! That are fun, well paced, and repeat key lessons and tips.

  • Using videos is super helpful but also peoples comments attached to their projects on Ravelry is a huge help.

  • I first use knitting craft books with illustrations that I own. Second I search for videos posted by experts on YOUTUBE

  • Videos and written directions

  • Videos are great! What about an advanced Skill set app?

  • A combination of videos and written instructions help me master new techniques!

  • You tube videos! Can’t live without them when I’m trying to figure out a new (to me) knitting technique. Or I call my knitting guru Nancy (my knitting friend)

  • Videos are the most helpful support when I’m trying to master a new technique.

  • The bookmark feature on google for tutorials like these has been my friend when learning baking or knitting techniques.when I first learned Kitchener stitch, I thought there was no chance I would forget it or have to look it up again. But I must have googled it 12 times before it really stuck. Maybe because it took me so long to get to the next project requiring its use. That one is in the brain now, but I learned to bookmark things I do for the first time.

  • I can follow written instructions most of the time, but if I have a hard time wrapping my head around something a video is way more helpful. Something about watching someone else’s hands go through the motions is magic.

  • Clear, accurate instructions, with video

  • Best learning method for me is in person at my LYS. If they cannot happen (I.e., the middle of the night), I prefer a slow-motion uTube along with my needles and yarn in hand.

    I’ve never had the nerve to try brioche. Winning this package would push me into it! Thanks for all you do.

  • I like a video tutorial that I can watch several times before I try a new technique. It’s like a friend without the worry if it takes a while for it to sink in.:)

  • I love to watch videos with techniques instructions.

  • Videos and ample practice time/opportunities. I’m mostly a visual learner, so when I was first starting to knit, knittinghelp.com was my best friend once it arrived on the scene.

  • Brioche is an interesting technique that I’ve not quite mastered. Perhaps your video will provide exactly what I need to get there.

  • I find looking at videos or a photo tutorial helps with learning a new technique or stitch pattern.

  • I use everything I can; video, written tutorials, line by line instructions for sanity and oh course the MDK site.

  • Following along with video tutorials. And backing them up and rewatching till I get it right!

  • Research!

  • Regarding the most helpful learning support I’m
    torn between saying a detailed written description that helps me understand the why of what I’m learning, or a video that gives me an idea of how to physically do what I am learning. Both can be quite helpful.

  • Friends & YouTube