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Atlas Insider: Photo Album

April 24, 2022

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  • Natural lighting and a contrasting background.

    • Go outside!

      • I’m supposed to photograph my knitting?

        • This comment struck me as so funny! Thanx for making me LOL today, I needed it!

        • Are you me? I don’t usually bother unless I’m participating in a contest or knit along. When I do photograph it, I try for natural light on a slightly overcast day.

        • i’m with you…. i’m just happy i knit it!!!! there are so many things where i evidently didn’t get the memo that it was a thing

      • Using natural light is the only way I’ve been able to take decent photos.

      • Allow some time. Clean it up with Snapseed

  • Truly still figuring out this point myself… lighting and angle, flat or on a person?

    • An interesting pose – on the floor.

      • On my bed, or on myself, in the mirror! Old school, but I like it!

        • I can give no advice on knitting photography but will gladly try any advice given!

  • I lay out my item on a contrasting floor, and stand on a short ladder to take the picture!

    • Lighting and still figuring out the right angle!

    • A ladder is a great idea – thanks!

    • Yes, lighting is important and a neutral background, unless it’s a cute garment knit for a little person- then it’s a photo with them wearing it

  • Sun and fun setting (lots of hats)

    • Everyone in their new sweater, in front of the Christmas tree. Sullen expressions on the teen’s faces optional (and hysterically funny 30 years later.)

  • I photograph my knits outside in natural light weather permitting: on the deck railing with views to the yard; on the textured glass table; among the plants. In the front yard hanging over a tree limb/branch especially when flowering.

  • I take most pictures outside in “north light”–in bright shade or on light cloudy days, If I want to highlight texture, then I put it in a place where the light is coming from the side.

  • Draping them, artistically (!) of course!

  • Photo shoot on the cherry table… good background.

  • Natural light and a natural background – on a wooden table, or outside in front of trees, stone, brick, etc

  • I have to get my daughter to model for me on a day when its not raining or snowing. I try to get something nice in the background

  • Still trying to work this out. Natural light seems best.

    • I’m definitely not in a position to give tips, but am loving all of these!

  • Lighting: more of it from a couple different angles.

  • I take the picture outside.

  • I block everything first. Then to photograph, I typically lay them out atop my ebony baby grand piano! It’s a striking backdrop for virtually every color, especially since I knit a lot of bright colors. And seldom knit black.

  • I have great natural light in my house and it does the work for me most of the time. What we need, though, is a class called “photography for spouses of knitters,” because my husband never quite understands that the picture isn’t of me and the whole back yard, but of the sweater. Bless his heart.

    • My best photographs are outside in natural light.

    • My husband is like Laura’s, if he takes the picture it never quite shows the shawl (or hat or whatever), and I always think I look awful, regardless of the lighting or the setting. So I usually photograph the item on the blocking board, on top of the extra bed, upstairs under a sky light.

  • Natural light … Maybe taking the picture during the golden hour and most importantly, having an artistic Husband who’s hobby is photography and have him take the pictures of my FOs!

  • I use the late afternoon sun!

  • Being a terrible photographer, my tip is to have someone else take the picture for me!

  • Natural light!

  • Natural light for sure… and making the dog a part of the photo seems to help too.

    • If only my dog would sit still… pull out the phone (camera) and he immediately runs to me, or runs away.

  • Background matters.

    • Natural light through the sliding doors, with a cat supervising the photo shoot (and adding the “awww” element).

  • Try to show a variety of shots. Some motion shots – so have the model move around, and then some close macro shots to show the stitch work. Outdoor light is best.

  • I take decent pictures of plants but I struggle with knitting pictures

  • Standing up straight and sucking in my post middle aged (Exactly when did that happen?!) gut.

  • The best natural lighting and even sometimes a ring light if I’m doing a selfie. A selfie stand helps too. I prefer pictures of the garment being worn vs lying flat. I have yet to get the color as I see it (could be my developing cataracts ) but taking several shots sometimes helps.

  • Say silly things to the model until she cracks up and says ‘Grandma’!

  • Have not mastered photographing my hand knits

    • Maybe they’ll tell us how.

  • I have not done it often, but when I did I used my sewing dress form to stage and drape the shawls and cowl. Plain gray fabric on the dress form first. Plain cream color sheet backdrop. Daylight in room but with camera flash, too. The shots worked well in a guild newsletter.

  • My tip is to use the Schubert outdoors for small items. Natural light is best. But for the blankets, use the inside carpet and get a step stool or ladder so you can get above it. iPhone does the job.

  • Lately I’ve been shooting baby items on a sheepskin from IKEA. It’s a light background with a soft texture

  • Photos look best with a contrasting, neutral background. I have taken many where the knitwear is overshadowed by its backing, lesson learned by me, xx.

  • Y

  • Beats me! I’m going to read all the comments to learn more.

  • Natural light against my well worn teak table for a natural background.

  • Sorry my last post was an oops. I haven’t done much photographing of my pieces yet. Reading the comments are tempting me to try!

  • Great tips for beautiful photos, but don’t forget to also include photos that show the structure of the piece. Such as: the back of the sweater, a flat shot to show the shape (especially shawls), detail of a complicated stitch or a clever construction. We are more than just a pretty face, right?

    • These are all great advice. I can’t tell you how frustrating it is to see the skinny, pouty model standing sideways with her arms crossed, blocking out any view of the garment being sold. I have a number of beautifully photographed knitting books where the model is standing in some breath taking locale way off in the distance, her sweater nothing but a blur.

      • Oh, yes…I SO agree!! I never mind when designers include beautiful artistic photos (who doesn’t love a good photo?!?) but please, please add some not so artistic ones, too, to show the detail(s) of the handknit from the front, back, side, shoulder, etc.

  • Lighting and background

  • Natural light, and I like photos with models. That’s what I am most interested in seeing when looking for new patterns, how they look when being worn.

    • My dining room table provides a neutral background with natural lighting.

  • A plain background like a rug or a view outdoors

  • I photograph them in nature whenever possible, from skeins to my stash to the finished product! The light is magical, and the colors add dimension to everything.

  • I’ll let you know when I figure it out!

  • Natural light. But even so, colors don’t often appear the way I see them. Fun view of MDK!

  • Natural light, uncluttered background, take shots from several angles and a close up so you can show off your stitches.

  • I like action shots of WIPs and try for a closeup of the fabric on the needles. For FOs, failing a model, outdoors draped over something in natural light is my go-to, or for small stuff artfully arranged on my herringbone bedspread with background clutter shoved aside.

  • I take them outdoors(avoiding rainy days) brick steps, boulders, and even snow on surfaces make for interesting textural backdrops that compliment yarn colors.

  • I seem to wait for a sunny day and go near a window to place item on hardwood floor or light beige carpeting.

  • Just keeping the cats off long enough to get photo.

  • Still learning and trying to get hints from good pictures

  • Natural light and an accent color or texture in the background.

  • On my dining room table, natural light and with fingers crossed!

    • Natural morning light with iPhone portrait mode. Good background — usually dining room table or carpet. Sweaters are the most difficult because I don’t have someone to model.

  • I discovered that I have a lovely antique hook near a window that gets beautiful morning light, so I hanging my knitwear on a wooden hanger and snap a shot.

  • It’s about trying to keep cat hair off and natural light.

  • I find that finishing a knitted garment is a huge accomplishment for me and then faced with the task of taking a decent photo…Lordy! I have the best luck with cloudy days and natural backgrounds. Admittedly I could use some help.

  • Contrasting solid colour background. No rays of sun.

  • My top tip for photographing hand kits is to have someone else do it.

  • If I want a really good photo, I ask my husband to take it!

  • “Let your photo tell a story” advice from a friend who takes wonderful photos of her designs.

  • I have tried lots of lighting and backgrounds, but the best is always my terracotta kitchen tile floor with overhead light.

  • Natural light seems best. Still figuring it out.

  • photograph it being worn/used/posed

  • My hand knits, and those of the other women I knit with at church, are laid out on the table in front of the sofa with all their beauty displayed. We have albums of all our handiwork over our ten years of knitting for charity.

  • Natural light and a contrasting background. I just bought a wig form for hats!

  • I put the hand knit on the dining room table, then stand over it for a birds-eye view.

  • I photograph everything with the red background of the chaise on which I knit.

  • Add a cat (they’re going to sit on it anyway…)

  • Natural light

  • For my socks (which make up most of my handknits) lots of sunlight, often on a wood background with plants!

  • On a person with natural light

  • I wish I could take better FOs pics – somehow they never come out like I think they will. I want natural, relaxed, artsy; I get stiff, posed, bad yearbook pic!

  • Natural light helps but not much. I’m not a great photographer!!!

  • Not asking my husband to take the photo when I’m the model.

  • Take lots and lots of pictures. Pixels are free. I bet you knew I’d say that 😉

  • Find an uncluttered background so the hand knit is the focal point

  • I love the photo’s and always look forward to the moderndaily knittting mails.
    Your knitting photo’s are good but sometimes I miss a close up of a stitch pattern and I like for pattern good contrast of background and knitted piece but that is because my eyes are not so good.

  • Toss the garment on one of my old teak benches, one outside and covered in lichen, or the one on the front porch sheltered from the elements which can be moved to have different views behind it! A crapshoot either way!

  • Whatever I try to accomplish with staging, background, lighting, it never comes out like what I pictured in my mind 🙁

  • I don’t take good pictures of my knitting, but any picture looks better with natural sunlight.

  • Actually remembering to take the darn photo!

  • Natural sunlight! No clutter!

  • Do it NOW! Don’t wait for the perfect lighting, just find the best lighting you can and take the picture NOW! Otherwise, time will get away from you and you will forget.

    This advice may only apply to me, but it has significantly changed the number of FOs that are documented. (Then the next tip: Remember to put the photo up on Ravelry so you can find it……..

  • Try to get your photo during the 30 seconds between finishing blocking and the item having dog and cat hair all over it…

  • First, I aim to finish them…

  • Outdoor lighting, but not glaring sunshine. And a neutral background.

  • Natural light.

  • Still a work in progress, I do like taking pictures of people wearing my hand knits.

  • I use the floor as background and sometimes my dog lends a helping hand(paw). Love your stuff

    • I opt for a plain neutral background. The purpose is NOT to show off my over-cluttered small house!

  • Hanging garments instead of having them on a flat surface, and taking shots from many different angles.

  • Plenty of natural light and a contrasting background.

  • I like to photograph my knits against familiar objects found around my home – a wooden bowl, an antique spool, a shed antler.

  • I like to take my pics in natural but indirect light to get the best color representation. Neutral but not white background for items that I’m laying flat.

  • Top tip? Remove the cat

    • Why?

  • Using my dogs as models then regretting it as I pick off endless dog hairs. If only they weren’t such adorable models.

  • My tip is to REMEMBER to photograph when I’ve finished a project!!

  • On a person✔️
    On the floor✔️
    Hanging on the door✔️

  • My top tip for photographing handknits is to do it. I always forget.

  • Smile!

  • Natural morning light with iPhone portrait mode.

  • When doing selfies use the timer on the phone to give a few seconds to adjust the face

  • Lighting, interesting angle, and not too much stuff in the frame.

  • take photo straight on and parallel unless I want to see a shadow

  • Outside in natural light .

  • Well, I always include a cat in the picture. Well, it’s more like a cat photo bombs ALL my pictures

  • I lay my knitted piece on the floor in good light and take a photo with my cell phone camera. I then send it to a sprocket to print and keep a journal of my finished projects. The print doesn’t represent the colors very well, but it reminds me what it was.

  • Put your project in a place to photograph with a lot less light than you think you would need.

  • Make sure nothing else is in the picture to take away from the finished project, unless it adds to it.

  • Enhancing whatever I shoot with good post production.

  • Good light, space to spread out, and dimension in laying out, like a fold over

  • My husband strapped together some sections of whitish/gray flooring. I set it up on my bed where the light comes in perfectly.

  • Im not very good but my best photos have been outside late afternoon or early morning.

  • Taking pics of adorable children in their new duds—can’t beat a cute kid for a win-win photo!

  • The floor is a good blank canvas.

  • Outside in natural light, not too much sun.

  • I mostly look at and try to recreate photo settings / setups that I’ve seen used elsewhere. What I must get better at is taking photos before I give items away!

  • I try to take pictures in natural light. That and have my friend who is a photographer take the pictures!

  • Good lighting! I’ve found my portable Ott light (the one that lives in my tote bag for evening knit group at the dimly lit coffee shop where the study group teens are amused/ fascinated by the well lit table covered with handcrafts) invaluable for capturing the true color of the yarn when the available light is less than ideal. And now I must go play True Colors because Cyndi Lauper is stuck in my head.

  • I always want a photo of the piece being worn. Photos where the FO isn’t on someone don’t provide enough information.

  • Haha – don’t let my shadow fall on the garment when I’m photographing it!

  • As most everyone else has said, light is the most important issue. It’s amazing how the color of the yarn changes depending on the light.

  • I take photos that illustrate what attracted me to the project in the first place

    • This is a great tip that I never gave a thought too! Thank you very much! I’m going to try & see if I can do this in future photos!

  • Top tip: Take them outside into natural lighting. Otherwise, the color rendition is never right.

  • Clear off the coffee table.

  • Bright light and a solid background.

  • Natural lighting seems to work well for me.

  • Get 2 kinds of photos, one with the garment on a human, and details of any steps that are hard to remember like steeks or buttonholes.

  • Natural light is a must and I have a silvery grey throw that I use as the background.

  • Natural light, wood floor

  • great lighting and a flat lay!

  • Natural sunlight and artful arranging— or a very cute model!

  • Using the same lighting for all photos in a series

  • I ask my photographer friends for tips!

  • I photograph outside on a sunny day.

  • On a model-preferably a cute kid, outside.

  • North light.

  • A nice, simple contrasting background is always helpful to make a project stand out.

  • The only time my knits got noticed was when I photographed them on a rickety, paint-splattered, shabby green stool. It is the “ugly” yellowish green that my friend Elaine swears goes with everything (sometimes in a very small dose.)

  • Check the background for unwanted distractions like balls of dog fur, dirty dishes, your own feet

  • I hang them on the back of our 1800’s barn where the lighting is diffused but bright, and the background is old gray wood. Small tacks hold the item on the wood without harming the shawl or garment.

  • Just let the cat lay on it, it’s not worth the effort to make her move

  • good lighting always

  • Simple background- natural light- and joy in the product!

  • Let my husband do it. He’s the professional in the family!

  • A photo box.

  • Make sure you clear the path between you and your phone if your taking a selfie using the timer function. Its not worth breaking your leg tripping over the flower pot and nobody wants to see your beautiful sweater hiked up around your armpits, midfall. Seriously though, i really appreciate seeing the finished garment worn by the intended recpient. Seeing it lying flat or on a mannequin isn’t as helpful if im trying to see how it fits.

  • Outside

  • Let my husband take the photo. He does it well, I do not.

  • Wish I had a good answer. I’m pretty good at photographing details but not the whole piece.

  • It’s interesting to see all the ideas for pictures. For me, it depends on the object. If it’s wearable by me, my husband takes my picture, preferably outside in good light and with an interesting background. If a blanket, I drape it over a couch or railing.

  • photograph indoors on a very plain background.

  • love the bento bag. Good way to carry my knitting

  • top tip / Have someone else take the photograph. Mary in Cincinnati

  • Natural light—ideally direct sunlight. And letting my object (finished or in-progress) be scrunched up or draped over a chair unevenly or in some way 3-D just for increased visual interest

  • Natural light, and my dressmaker’s form.

  • Contrast, background, lighting- show the whole item instead of “artsy”, and a view or two modeled as you best imagine.

  • I have yet to photograph a knitting project

  • My tip, don’t move your fingers over the lens when you click to pic.

    • Haha! I’ve done that!

  • Smile! You finished it!

  • Natural light, & if that cat wants to be in the shot, let the cat be in the shot!

  • Make sure everything in the frame is there on purpose.

  • Natural light – and I wish more knitters photographed their knits on the intended wearer (including themselves). So much more information for fellow knitters that way! (This is a plea – please!)

  • background and lighting. I have a wooden deck and a large granite (mainly white) stepping stone that provide a neutral background with just a bit of texture

  • Gotta take it outside! Use portrait mode on your phone for that shallow depth of field we associate with professional photography. Check the background for visual clutter.

    Please, please, for pity’s sake, no mirror selfies. Pay or cajole someone to photograph you – you’re worth it.

  • Still working on this skill, afternoon lighting and uninteresting background is my usual method

  • My baby blankets get laid on the back of the couch, avoiding a shadow from the light. Scarves go around the recipient’s neck.

  • I like to photograph my hand knits outdoors on a cloudy day.

  • good lighting

  • Natural light is not always easy to come by in the Seattle area so an Ott light has to do.

  • Don’t have your husband take the picture!

  • I agree with everyone who said neutral background and natural light…I have a lighter wood table and a darker wood table that I use outside, depending on the colors in the piece I’m photographing.

  • Portrait setting on an angle is my default strategy. I’m just a novice but it gives photos some character.

  • I just keep taking pictures until I get one that makes me feel like I am getting what I feel when i look at the piece. sometimes inside sometimes contrasting. As i type this I realize I have never taken a picture of my knitting wet as I get ready to block it. Maybe next.

  • Photos? Too many times I forget to even take one!!

  • On a model

  • I mostly take photos to share with my mother-in-law, an avid knitter, so my aim is fairly good light and capturing the color correctly. And remembering to take pictures of each project.

  • Outside – natural light. Overcast day seems to be best.

  • Natural light!

  • Sunshine!

  • Paying attention to light and shadow … don’t always get it right. Several shots, close up and pulled back to show stitch pattern/definition and how it relates to the whole.

  • Small knits – like hats, bags, mittens, and new skeins – I place on a large sheet of white craft paper. I like to photograph these in front of my sliding glass window with only natural light. Larger, wearable items, I also like to photograph in natural light. I usually prop my camera on the window ledge, set the timer, and take the photo while I am in front of the window with the natural light hitting me.

  • I’m hoping to get some good tips here…the best I do on my own is to have natural light and a contrasting background.

  • Natural lighting; plain contrasting background, wood is nice

  • My day started out with a picture of a Painted Bunting in our birdbath! Yea Earth Day!! Remember to use color when photographing these beauties. And remember to add a small bird bath to the shop next winter. Oh then I moved onto a picture of a tiny hummingbird feather left behind on a petunia stem. Sometimes it’s all about light reflecting life!
    Back to my sock knitting! Binoculars close by!

  • Indirect natural light, and I clean the fingerprints off the lens on the iPhone camera.

  • Outdoor photos whenever possible are so helpful for true colors and subtleties of colors in beautiful hand dyed yarn

  • My iphone, macro lens and natural light.

  • At first I was knitting my hand knits on the wood floor in natural light, but I realized that the revelry photos I found most helpful showed knits on a person. So even though I feel self-conscious, I put in my hand knit and ask my husband to take a photo of me outside.

  • None – just want others’ advice

  • Natural light, fill the frame with the project, drape to create motion, include something interesting/living, like part of a plant, flowers, etc, multiple shots, edit and crop to your liking.
    Photos can tell a story, create mood, mystery. Have fun with it 🙂

  • Be sure to photograph in natural light! It really helps with visualizing stitch definition and highlights colors.

  • I find dogs to be the best accessory for a photo, although sleepy cats work well too

  • Like everyone else said

  • Outside on a lightly overcast day. It’s still hard to get a good photo.

  • I like to take my finished project outside or have the person it’s made for have it in.

  • Increase contrast. I have an eye disease that is destroying my ability to perceive contrast. Also, people who have cataracts have decreased perception of contrast until they have cataract surgery and their eyesight returns to normal. Use medium to light colors of yarn and put them against dark backgrounds. Use sunlight not artificial light. Put the light at an angle to the object being photographed to maximize shadows among the stitches so we can see the stitch definition. Chris does a good job and the photography quality here is a major reason that I read these articles. The internet, however, is full of poor quality photography.

  • Have my adorable granddaughter wear the knitwear.

  • Soft light and someone else taking the picture.

  • Alway avoid sunshine on your subject. Cloudy days are best for taking photos.

  • Best photos are done outside at dawn or dusk or even a cloudy day.. The indirect light seems to make all the difference.

  • I hardly ever take pictures of any kind, so first I re acquaint myself with the telephone’s camera. Whenever I go to the camera it is on regular photograph if I want a selfie, and selfie if I want a regular photograph. So, I have to adjust that that feature. Then, I figure out a way to photograph the hand knit to get the whole thing in the picture, not cut any of it out. That usually involves me standing on tippy toes and pointing the camera straight down. Then I start taking shots of the garment and choose the one I want. Next, I begin to re aquaint myself with how to fine tune the picture. Hopefully it comes out OK, and I don’t have to repeat the process!

  • Top tip: take pix outdoors on a cloudy day. Topmost tip: get someone else to take the pix – you know, someone who can actually take good pictures. 😉

  • Actually get them knitted!!!

  • Get sunshine into the shot.

  • Unfortunately, my tip is make sure your camera is not on video.

  • lay out colorful knitted project on a background of a aran knitted blanket for contrast

  • The right lighting and angle

  • To get the best colours I lay out the hand knit in the sun on a neutral background, usually the floor. Hopefully I get a good spot again when I move in a few months!

  • Natural light always helps!

  • Filtered light and portrait setting

  • There are so many good suggestions here.
    Before we moved from LA, I used to arrange knits on the polished concrete floor, by the full length windows. Everything looked good there. Here in Portland I haven’t yet identified the best place. On the lawn might be good, but not in the pouring rain…

  • Outdoor light is best, and finding a light background to get good contrast

  • I’m not very good at photographing my knits so maybe my best advice is not to listen to me! But seriously, I try to remember tips about posing more naturally (lift head and chin, one hand on hip, one foot forward) when having someone photograph me in a new sweater.

  • Go outside, use nature light. Give the item context. If it is a glove, put it on a hand.

  • Natural light, standing on shaky chairs, and artfully getting the cats involved.

  • I use the same familiar props, shoot lots of angles, crop and enhance. Photos of projects are shared or saved for future reference.

  • Lighting and a neutral background.

  • Natural Light! I always try to take them outside to photograph. And if I’m at the cottage with the lake in the background, all the better.

  • Lots of light, so there are no shadows. And crumpled up a bit – not laid out flat. Of course, a garment is best shown on a person, so the viewer can see how it fits and hangs.

  • A great model and lots of light.

  • I use a Solid background , great natural lighting and for hats plus scarves a fake model head.

  • Natural light gives the best results.

  • Usually laid out on the blocking mats

  • I take my photos outside, in the shade, whenever Ican.

  • One yard of white linen as a backdrop.

  • good lighting and enough distance for a good angle so it doesn’t distort any proportions.

  • Distract the pets with their breakfast *before* you lay the knitting out to photograph 😉

  • Natural lighting and strange angles. Straight on doesn’t usually highlight the stitch pattern or definition.

  • Include a cat (like I have a choice!j

  • When I photograph them, I do so in my back yard. However I don’t usually bother to photograph and I don’t keep much of a record of what I have made. I started out doing so on ravelry but pretty soon stopped!

  • The morning light on my terrace (I live in an apartment) is just perfect for photographing handknits. I have a pretty wicker table which I use as a back drop. Works every time.

  • I wish I had photographed all the nice things I have knit!

  • Good lighting and take some close up shots of the details.

  • Dutch babies are made to be eaten… Mmm… Mmm… Good!

    Mine is just clear the background. Use a clear wooden surface. Or against jeans. Always, everything with jeans.

  • Light, light, and more light! Good contrast with background, if appropriate. And watch out for unintended shadow.

  • I place my finished objects on my piano bench in the living room where the natural light comes through the windows.

  • Natural light, ambient light. Nothing shining directly on the item.

  • Good lighting makes all the difference!

  • I retired July 1st 2021. I thought I’d be knitting up a storm but find myself completely grid locked. All I can do is read about it. If I were to make something then need to photograph it, I think I’d use natural light on an overcast day.

  • My top tip..wait for a bright day!

  • My tip is to read everyone else’s tips and try to incorporate as many as I can. Unfortunately I don’t have a baby grand.

  • Always include a cat in the photo ☺️

  • I have no secret or magic so I’m reading all the comments for hints!

  • Add contrast with one of my handmade baskets in the background and hopefully some dappled natural light

  • I slap that sucker on my bed, which may or may not actually be made, and take several random shots with my phone. Sometimes I add a note. Seriously – it’s the only way I get a record of what I’ve made as opposed to a mental list of questions and regrets.

  • Go outside! Indoor light with my phone camera never works out as well!

  • I go out on a cloudy morning and put my product down on the wood of the deck

  • I mostly knit sweaters for myself, so I put things down flat on a clean surface, turn on all the lights (I live in the deep dark woods), and make sure the hems are lying evenly. I usually take a few up close of details, like textures, sleeves, joins, and inside out if there are floats or other wrong side action.

  • Being an excellent procrastinator, the last end is worked in as the person who is at the receiving end is standing there waiting for it. Thus no time for pictures. Someday I will be so organized that I will have time to do so.

  • I always wait and photograph them on a cloudy day.

  • beautiful

  • I use a wooden hanger for sweaters and hang them on an armoire door.

  • Natural light and a background of nature

  • photograph my knitting? Now there is a thought!

  • Love black and white photography.

  • Typically I use a felt hanger.

  • Making sure my textile-collecting,very smart,very powerful, fun-luvvin’ cutting horse of a young GSD is nowhere near the focus of my atttention. Miles of high altitude sunshine, capable camera — and great yarn to start with.

  • My number one tip when taking pictures of my knitting projects is natural light I love how it makes colours look, how they look natural and not staged. I also love having my fur baby Ollie in the pictures.

  • Outside, draped over chair placed in flowerbed

  • Good light, preferably natural.

  • Good lighting and solid background.

  • Two words: natural light.

  • My super high-tech tip for photographing my knits is using my super cheap Ikea lamp! It always seems to be late at night and completely dark when I get the urge to photograph something, but if I put it under that lamp the colors are true and it captures the texture really well.

  • My best tip is have someone other than me take the picture.

  • Daylight!

  • Good lighting…. I usually take a day time photo so the colors show the best and sometimes I still turn on a lamp. Usually my knit items are posed on the table or floor. I’m no professional and not a model so that’s as good as it gets! But lighting is the most important thing for me.

  • Don’t photograph like I do. My pics are always lousy!

  • Thanks for all the tips! I’m going to start photographing my knitting…

  • Know what you’re trying to convey and photograph accordingly….
    Really though my top tip is wear your knits when going on photography!

  • nice lighting

  • My top tip: drape it over a guitar. This works best for scarves and shawl, of course, but it’s not too shabby for a hat.

  • If you are photographing yourself modeling the garment, prop the camera up and use the selfie camera so that you can see the shot and then use a timer to get yourself in position before it snaps. (I really don’t like photos of folks holding up their phones in the mirror).

  • Clean the rug before you plant the nicely knitted object you want to keep away from the dog hair. (at least for a little while…)

  • Natural light in the early evening works well in sunny Arizona

  • I just take a quick photo with my phone before I give the item away! I will read all these tips, and promptly forget them.

  • I live in a small dark house so I go outside for natural light, Overcast day is the best and I look for a uncluttered background that has uniform light. It is nice sometimes to take close up of some detail of the project.

  • I once made a pretty impressive makeshift white box for a cool photo of the jarod flood two-row noro scarf in an arty pile that showed the colors nicely!

  • My tip is good lighting and ZOOM IN so we can really see it!

  • Natural lighting! By a window or outside. But if you look at my Ravelry projects I am probably a batter source for how not to photograph your knits.

  • I’m terrible at taking photos of my knitting. There just aren’t any good places in my house, and finding a nice spot outside is hit or miss. So I generally just spread it out on my bed and let my cat in. It may not be the best picture, but Piper is cute.

  • Such great photos at Atlas! For photographing my knits, I like to lay them flat on my wood floor, and style them with entire outfits on the floor, jewelry and accessories included. But I don’t have a clue about lighting or composition…

  • Have a photographer friend do it I’m so bad at photography

  • natural light that is diffused so there are no shadows to obscure the knitting

  • I NEED photography tips, rather than having any tips to share. Thanks to all for these ideas.

  • On my beige or brown chair for contrast. Sometimes outside for natural light but not sunny -will often take contrasting colored towel for background..

  • Just take photographs.

  • Remember to take a photo before giving your knitted item to the gift recipient. Having a model is helpful.

  • Hey Chris, you have a quirky streak. I like that.
    I agree about the natural light, just not too strong. I go for a plain background. Haven’t taken any just recently but I’m sure the nearly 9 month old kittens will want to help, just like they help with folding clothes, making the bed….

    • So many very good ideas and tips.
      And many funny ones, too. I especially like “finish the project” and “make sure there’s nothing in the picture you don’t want in the picture, like dog hair, your feet, fingers….” (I combined a couple of comments there.)

  • Get someone other than me to take the pic! Second tip – sign me up for a photography class

  • A clean background and natural light! I’m the kind of person for whom clutter is invisible in daily life, so when taking pictures I’m often startled by the fact that the background ISN’T clean unless I put effort into it.

  • My handknit photo tip is take that picture before you’ve worn that sweater 80 times!

  • Outside, in the afternoon light…

  • Adjust the camera settings on your phone to take the largest picture size (highest megapixels). Have story in mind for the handknit and set up the background and other details in the photo accordingly.

  • Natural light on a model, several poses

  • Photograph in natural li GH ht

  • Natural lighting. Neutral background. Hide any misgivings!!!!

  • I use my ancient iPhone to take my photos. It does ok.

  • Top tip? Raise a talented daughter who’s a professional photographer with amazing cameras and fancy gear and ask her to take the pictures!

  • Remember to do it before you gift the item.

  • I still have trouble taking really good knitwear pictures, but the best tip is to go outside. That makes everything better.

  • My hubby is a great model! I always ask for a selfie from the recipient and because they are knit-worthy they always send a great shot.

  • lighting is definitely key to create the shadows that makes the stitch definition shine. I don’t always succeed, but I know that’s the issue if it’s not a successful photo. What I have always struggled with is taking photos of my black and white art quilts. The high contrast has the same issue as photographing in the snow (snow blindness). it’s really hard to get the texture to show with such high contrast.

  • Get someone else to wear it for the photo

  • I like to use reflector cards to move the light around my subject – it helps gives a little mood to what I’m taking pictures of as well as giving the stitches a different type of definition

  • I don’t think I have ever taken a photo of my FOs…

  • Use natural light in early morning, on a solid, contrasting background. Step stools, not ladders, for us senior citizens!

  • Use natural light whenever possible

  • I have my wife model all hats! I try to get the other items pictured in natural light and avoid shadows.

  • Natural lighting as much as possible. Flat service. And a dress form for wearables like sweaters and shawls.

  • Adding a flower or sentimental item in the frame which adds to the joy of completion.

  • Good lighting. You have to have good light in the picture if you want to see it shine.

  • My top tip for taking photos of handknits is to use the outdoors whenever you can – I seem to get the best light and color representation this way.

  • Using my gorgeous slate sunroom floor as a backdrop… but that’s hard now, as we moved five years ago!

  • I want to see how the garment fits and hangs. Natural light, outside, on a person.

  • I frequently find myself laying my projects onto a piece of white fabric to help the colours stay true.

  • Try not to cast a shadow on the knitting, and if it’s small item include your hand (skin) for better real color reproduction.

  • Always photograph in the daytime, but with diffused natural light; bright direct light and shadows are the enemy!

  • My knitting photo tip – just do it! I often forget to take a picture of things I have knit before they are out the door.

  • Good lighting, and patience. It’s worth taking a little time to lay it out properly, and decide what part/s of the item to have in the photo. Also if for Ravelry, I love to see the item on a person. It gives me so much more information of how it fits, how long it is etc.

  • Best advice for photographing knits: place the knit on a floor, a couch, or any other cat magnet. Wait. Snap.

  • I knit socks and last year(November) I decided to show a pair a day. HiTech…lay a pair on the floor and try to stand above it with my cell phone and not throw a shadow with my body. Yeah, but it worked.

  • I definitely try to get my sleek, lovely Tuxedo Cat to pose next to my knitting!
    Doesn’t always work…..

  • Natural lighting is preferable. Photograph close-up, in sections, to see detail. Flat surface is nice, but some 3D effect shows off texture, like folds, waviness for basic flat pieces; sitting upright, for hats or cowls (stuffed if necessary). Any open work needs a contrasting background to show through. Looking back at photos with just the knitting, no people, is fun. Porch railings and a backyard wooden bench are my favorite settings. But sweaters and ponchos seem to photograph best on people.

    • Wow! That is a great list of tips! I need to remember those! Thank you! If you read the comment I left 28 minutes after you, you’ll understand my need for great tips!

  • My best photo tip is to let someone else take the photos!! Haha! I only use my android phone camera & I kinda hope for the best! I am not selling my items so the photos are usually just for me & that’s good enough for now. Altho I do like photos of my knitting taken outside in the natural light.

  • Remember to TAKE a picture before gifting!

  • My kids take the best knitting photos. They have a good angle as they are short and they make me look tall!

  • A glass head covered with a nylon, covered with a handknit hat and natural lighting. A steady hand or tripod help.

  • Don’t let your husband take the pictures! LOL

  • I always forget to photograph my knitting!

  • A photo, even a mediocre one, that I have taken outdoors makes my knits look better than the best possible photograph taken with indoor lighting.

  • outside

  • I usually am in such a hurry to get gift knitting washed and blocked and wrapped that I completely forget to take a photo. Then I’m dependent upon the recipient to send me a picture …

  • Agree with natural daylight outside; and if I am wearing the object, I use the timer function.

  • That’s a good question. Probably lighting and a background that doesn’t detract from the subject.

  • Good question! As a papercrafter, I almost always take photos of my finished cards and scrapbook pages. As a knitter, I only occasionally snap a pic of a WIP to show my daughter or other knitterly friends!

  • Taking a selfie with the right angle in a mirror behind you

  • Use my pretty daughter as a model and go outside and start clicking.

  • I always try to take the photos in natural light with an interesting, but non-competitive background.

  • Natural light.

  • I like to knit with bright colors, so I take them outside to get the color as close to the item as I can. I love to get pictures on the fall leaves!

  • Take your photos outside!

  • Too photo tip – take it outside, natural light is best.

  • Trying not to get my own shadow in the pic!

  • Enough lighting, natural if possible. Simple background with no clutter visible. (Cats usually acceptable.)

  • I make sure the background is free from anything that would distract from my piece.

  • I am not savvy with my iPhone camera. So I usually correct the lighting !

  • My main goal is to not have a dog lie on it while I am trying to avoid my shadow.

  • I like to take my knitting out on adventures with me whether on a tromp through the park around the corner from my house, the NYC St. Patrick’s Day parade, or a Patti Smith show at Bowery Ballroom. When I remember to take photos (sometimes I’m having too good a time) they’re my favorites.

  • This is is still a work in progress for me! I never seem to get the lighting right.

  • Get outside. If you are modeling something, try not to think about your hands. I’m certain that once you start thinking about them, they only do awkward things and the whole photoshoot goes downhill from there:)

  • I do a lot more crochet amigurumi than knitting. I make sure to get different angles and a neutral background.

  • choose a neutral background. clean, uncluttered spaces are best. add a bit of excitement with something that speaks to the viewer, e.g., a blond knitting bowl or a leafy branch.

  • Find a window in your house and photograph when the sun is NOT shining through it.

  • Natural lighting! Outside!

  • Natural lighting!

  • Northern light seems to give the most accurate colors!

  • Remembering to take the photos before I start using the thing or send the gift!

  • It’s all about perfect lighting and the setting outside is a perfect place to find a setting for my hand knit items

  • Natural lighting

  • Outside, preferably on a overcast day (fewer shadows, fewer squints!), against a woodsy background (which provides a natural, contrasting backdrop)

  • Put a dog in the pic!

  • All of the above, and play some Bowie in the background.

  • Natural lighting, contrasting background that’s not too busy, and a happy model wearing the piece.

  • Natural lighting. Have at least one pic of the entire item, and at least one illustrating how item looks when worn/displayed/used as intended.

  • Take photos in full sun with nature in background

  • You have to finish them first!

  • Person wears it and poses on my porch!

  • Let the cat or dog get in the shot.

  • I arrange my shawls in kind of a “pool” on the hardwood floor or hang them draped over branches if a juniper tree then snap a photo. Have even draped them over the deck rail or the barbed wire fence.

  • Wouldn’t I first have to learn how to use the camera??

  • Finished work: Turn on all the lights in the room. Lay out my knitted piece on a horizontal surface of a neutral color. Stand on a step stool to get enough distance from it. In progress work: Shoot from whatever position I’m working in.

  • Alongside textures. A grouping of houseplants, a sculpture and interesting pots.

  • I like to use natural light but wish I knew more about photography.

  • Outside, in late afternoon. Raking light, as the sun just begins to go down, captures details well.

  • i stopped snapping shots
    when time leaked and seeped beyond
    became dear to knit

  • Morning light is a must. Often use bedroom bamboo floor as a neutral backdrop.

  • Natural light! And give the little ones a snack to keep busy hands far from what you are trying to photograph…

  • My top tip for photographing handknits is to put it on one of my kids. That way everyone looks at the sweet smile, and any mistakes in the knitting are forgotten.

  • What was the question? Here’s my entry for this week, my answer would be: whatever makes me happiest and joyfulest in my art-mind this week!

  • I still haven’t figured out how to take a good photo, especially for lace knits. I usually just lay it out flat on the floor and try to get above without shadows.

  • as Andrea Mowry says, go outside, but not in very bright sun–use early morning or dusk times for a softer light.

  • Lights!

  • Good lighting and a neutral background

  • Zoom in to see the stich details at the tricky parts.

  • I have a large ottoman that I placed the item on. The Ottoman is in front of a window so I get natural light. Then I get a stepstool stand on it and take the picture from above.

  • Good question! I usually snap a quick selfie, but now you’ve got me thinking!

  • I need tips! I usually take pictures wearing them but they aren’t great!

  • natural light but on a partly cloudy day to diffuse the light a bit

  • One of my best shots was a shawl hung on a clothesline with the woods in the background. I like to use nature as a backdrop if possible.

  • When I do take pictures, I like to take them outdoors when the sun is bright, but not glaring. I’m usually solo, so I tend to arrange them on a hanger on a tree or bush (looks better than it sounds.)

  • Natural light and being outside makes for the best shots for me. Thanks for the chance to win!

  • Provide more than one photo so you can show detail, show it on, show it all and show it off!

  • My best photos are taken outside in natural light

  • Get outside. Have a human or pet, especially the lucky person who gets to wear the finished knit, in the photo.

  • I use a dress form with a simple black dress on it for contrast and good lighting is always a must!

  • Lots of light, contrasting background.

  • Natural light, my iPhone, usually on my wood table or floor. Take lots of shots! Sometimes my cat helps.

  • Might sound like I’m joking but am serious: have someone else take the pictures!!

  • I am underwhelmed with my attempts to photograph my knits.

  • I read somewhere you should photograph with side light. It works!

  • Natural lighting and a background that has texture and color that enhances the project. Typical backgrounds: the mossy bricks of my patio, the slate of my front porch floor, a rusty metal mesh table, worn slats of a weathered wood bench.

  • Good lighting for sure.

  • I take horrible pictures of my knits. I will have to read the comments !

  • I’m a rotten photographer of my handknits, but I can tell you what I like to see in pattern photos, specifically. While I enjoy an artsy photo of a sweater, I really appreciate pics that show details.

  • natural light, and zoom in close on a detail… a button, an increase, a cable…i knit baby things and my best photos are of the little details, not the whole piece

  • A macro lens, for stitch detail.

  • Sunlight and a wooden floor or table

  • photograph during daylight hours

  • I don’t really photograph much! If I do, I’m sure I don’t show enough attention to the lighting. The only thing I DO do is try and make sure there’s nothing too busy in the background.

  • Take remotely by using the shutter timer on the iphone camera.

  • Outside lighting and portrait mode on my phone

  • Natural light…always, always, always!

  • Lay them flat on the carpet, showing front and back. Nothing special, or photos will never get taken.

  • I like to show my finished item against a plain background. In my Texas house it’s the backyard wood fence. I take a picture of every finished item and put the pictures in an album. Some items I don’t even remember!

  • I just don’t. So I have no tips. Sorry.

  • I’m terrible at photographing my work! The lighting in my house just isn’t very good. But I have fun trying anyway.

  • I ask a professional, my husband.

  • Outdoor photo with neutral textured background and an interesting object

  • Just try to get it in focus.

  • Edit your photos and make sure they are not sideways!

  • I’m getting better at photographing my knitted items that I usually post on Ravelry so I have a record of where all my yarn has gone. I find that tapping on the camera screen to bring item into focus generally gives me good results.

  • Magnificent pictures! As the world’s worst photographer, a genetic trait handed down by my parents (AKA the “all heads must be cut off ” couple), my tip is to HIRE a photographer who has talent!

  • Outside lighting is always better! And I like the contrast that wood provides. So I often photograph with my hand knits nicely laid out on my natural wood deck! Instant panache and very pretty!

  • Try to photograph in indirect natural light and a neutral background (preferably not white).

  • I use the trees on my property to hang hand knits from for photographs and, when the weather is totally uncooperative, I use my natural oak stairs or my weather beaten old farm table. Background and light.

  • I let my better half do it.

  • Overhead camera

  • Go outside!

  • Sorry – no tips. Not a photographer.

  • Still trying to figure out the best way. Definitely natural light but other than that my pics are boring!

  • My top tip for photographing my hand-knits: Contain the cat, unless you want her in the picture. Also, try not to get your feet in the picture, or remember to crop them out later. Two top tips.

  • I place it on my brown leather chair.

  • Cute models (nieces and nephews tend to be the best, but dogs will do in a pinch)

  • I could use some tips, honestly, but taking pictures outside on a day with filtered sunlight is the best thing I know. (Think lightly cloudy.) If the light is too bright or it’s too cloudy, the pictures don’t come out nearly as well.

  • Plenty of natural light

  • Let my camera give me the “best shot” signal and snap away.

  • The best photos I’ve taken of my knits are always outside. Inside lighting always makes them look a different color.

  • Be sure and block your project first and use natural lighting whenever possible.

  • I am horrible at taking photos of my knits (and everything else, too!) but one thing I learned is to use natural outdoor lighting…in the shade, not in direct sunlight. Makes a HUGE difference! In a pinch, I’ll take photos indoors with the natural afternoon light, too.

  • My best trick when photoing my knits are two things. 1- have my niece be my model (she is tall and stately, making all my projects look good) and 2- get as much pure sunlight on the project as possible.

  • Thanks for the giveaway!

  • No tips, I have a tough time!

  • I like to photograph drapey knits on trees outside about 10am. And then take a walk.

  • I have the best results when I go outside to photograph my knitted creations. I always feel happier outside and so do my knitted shawls and sweaters. I do like to photograph socks I made by shooting straight down at my feet while I’m standing.

  • I end up just taking them on the bed with a plain cover. I try to remember to take about few photos early on then later when I’m finished. I also take inside and outside of the project and details so if I want to make it again or a version I’m not starting from scratch. (I also save these in “Notes” w needle size and a photo of the yarn label.)

  • I wear the knitted piece and take a selfie with a great big smile!

  • Have someone else take the photo of it on you. Selfies just don’t often do the piece justice.

  • Find a cute model within your family – babies work really well for making knitting look great 😉

  • I’ve never photographed any of my knits, so I suppose my advice is, to just do it!

  • I’ve read that having something black and something white in the frame helps the camera adjust its lighting settings. Still experimenting with that concept. Mostly I’ve learned that my phone camera wants to overexpose anything in daylight. In the desert, when one is outside, it becomes very hard to avoid having daylight in one’s shots (during the day). It might be time to take some kind of class in phone camera photography!

  • I have a strictly decorative mannequin that I use all the time to shoot photos for my Ravelry account. I can drag it around to the best natural light and plain background and I don’t have to model stuff or lay it flat and lifeless on a bed or table.

  • I’m still working on that question…knitter yes…photographer, not so much:)

  • Show it off

  • I am a terrible photographer, so my best tip would be to have someone else do it! Otherwise, good blocking, good light, and lots of photos so you have many to choose from.

  • Neutral background that doesn’t distract from the knitted item. Lots of natural light

  • Lighting is key. Blacks are impossible to photograph! I’m watching comments for tips, because I never seen to “get it right.”
    Thanks for this topic! BTW, the photos today are stunning!! ❤️

  • I take my knitting outside on the porch, not is too bright a sun. You can see the details better.

  • A light box or some semblance of one is a great tool for yarn and other items that fit in the light box.

  • Capture the functioning knitwear.

  • good lighting, background that is not distracting (stray objects, too much patterning, etc)

  • use natural light and a wood floor.

  • Take FO photos outside, perhaps on grass or hanging in a tree or bush, sometimes a clothes hanger or clothespins are helpful for positioning. Or with a friend to wear the FO or take the photos.

  • Natural light from the bathroom window out to the hall.

  • If you are photographing a shawl for a pattern be sure to have one where the shawl is laid out flat or held extended. Wrapped around shoulders or neck doesn’t let me know what the shawl shape is!

  • Photo tip for handknits–always outdoors! the natural ight just seems to highlight the stiches so much better!

  • I photograph all my knitting projects for a journal of them all. There are notes on the yarn, the pattern, who it was for, ball bands for washing instructions, ect. I find myself walking around the house with the completed piece looking for just the right light to show the color and stitching – seems it depends on the day and the project to find just the right place. Best of all is when the recipient will model!

  • Be aware of your background color and texture so that you are not interfering with the the texture and color of your knitted work. You want to be sure that it doesn’t wash out or take away from your work.

  • Adjust your lighting so that there are minimal shadows in the stitches.