Each One, Teach One: Lou

October 13, 2021

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24 Comments
  • Love your Hitchhiker!
    Welcome back to the fascinating world of knitting!

  • Bravo! Isn’t it a bit like running into two childhood friends named Knit and Purl and catching up on all that has happened in their lives (colorwork, intarsia, increasing and decreasing their little stitch family, etc.?

    • Love this

  • Welcome aboard, Lou!

  • Welcome to the party, Lou! Your projects are all beautiful!

  • You have inspired me to knit another Hitchhiker !

  • Love your hitchhiker! I just knitted myself one from my handspun – it’s a great pattern for hand dyed yarn/fiber.

    • I’ve just knitted one too, from Hedgehog Fibres Sock. Great pattern for hand dyed, variegated yarns!

  • I love using my Field Guides….is there a index guide that you can just look at and know which one the skill you are looking for is in. That would be so great. You know you saw something you want to use but which one. I have all of them. What a handy guide that would be and people that only have one or 2 would know what the are missing.

    • There isn’t an index that I’ve seen, and what a great idea to cross reference Field Guides with the Skill Set guide. The index and cross reference wouldn’t even need to be a printed version…a downloadable pdf would be perfect.

    • Yes! I too have all the FGs, and I’ve been wishing for an index since around #5. Welcome Lou!

  • I too am back to knitting and so glad that a friend mentioned MDK. I especially like the ‘modern’ knits and new techs I’m learning. So much more than my mom’s knits but ever so grateful she taught me the basics. Skill Set and Beginnings got me back on track and now plowing thru Lopi. Loving it! Cheers!

  • This proves that you can teach a mature dog new tricks!

  • I wish our schools taught knitting and crocheting. It gives children both hand/eye/mind coordination, and mathematics.

    • Very good point. My understanding is that knitting is taught in the Waldorf schools to boys and girls.

  • Success! Does the guide have illustrations/instructions for left handed people?

  • Your scarf if beautiful and looks very well done. You are no longer a beginner!

  • Good for you! You’ve come a long way!

    I don’t understand why the long tail method of the slingshot is the go-to cast on when much easier ways are possible. A 3D challenged person such as myself would have stopped right there.

    Carry on!

    • If yours is not a rhetorical question, as a former knitting instructor I will offer the LT CO gives a sturdy edge, does not mess with the gauge of the first row, and is easy to work into. Other candidates include the knitted CO.

  • Welcome to MDK Lou, and welcome back to knitting! I was especially touched to learn that you used your grandmother’s knitting needles. Such a beautiful connection to your dear granny as her needles continue to be used in the creative process.

    There is so much information that I always want to give when I meet a new knitter, or someone who is interested in first learning to knit. However, I think that I have scared off a few people by overwhelming them with information they were not yet ready to hear. This is why I got the Skill Set app so that I would always have with me just the right amount of information for teaching knitting, and that I could meet a newbie knitter at their level in an encouraging and supportive way.

  • Delightful story! Looking forward to hearing more from Lou.

  • I, too, love your Hitchhiker! I know that I have an unfinished one hiding somewhere!

  • New knitters now are blessed with hundreds of online resources, mostly free.. Even the thing students whom I taught to knit in an age school class, would y get excited to finish their projects before the next class and look up how to do the next stich, cast off, it whatever and go online to find out. So you a practically infinite number of resources to help you expand your skills!

    And Martina Behms’ (Strickmich) patterns are great! Very easy, stylish and great for yarns that might tend to pool or be a bit loud with their color combinations.

  • For all it’s apparent complicated-ness, the Long Tail CO is amazingly intuitive and easy to learn for most people. “If I could do it, you could do it”. Really. There are some other knitting techniques – I have found – that look easier but are harder to either do or maintain accurately. Seed stitch for example. I think it’s about how your brain works. I always started out fine but then would lapse into ribbing (the opposite sequence). Much better at it now.